Nice African American Journalist photos

المدينه للاسهم عمان A few nice african american journalist images I found:

http://invitationalshootout.com/tag/2016/feed/ download xmeter forex http://www.homelesshounds.org.uk/?mikstyra=%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A7%D8%B3%D9%87%D9%85-%D8%B9%D9%85%D8%A7%D9%86%D8%AA%D9%84&474=a9 الاسهم عمانتل 56_We have for breakfast salt-fish, fried potatoes and treason
african american journalist
växla pengar forex under 18 Image by Jim Surkamp
Hamilton Hatter’s Tense Charles Town, WV 1865-1867 – While the ruins are still smoking

forex kortbetalning Transcript from Video
youtu.be/YqCZlSMFVCs TRT: 26:58

المتاجرة في الذهب With generous, community-minded support from American Public University System. (The sentiments in this production do not in any way reflect modern-day policies of APUS). More at apus.edu

ag markets forex 1_Mother of thine stone fountains
Mother of thine stone fountains; my heart goes back with the setting sun; my heart, my heart is in the mountains. (piano).

كم الطلب على اسهم الاهلي 2_The “Most Excellent” Hamilton Hatter
The “Most Excellent” Hamilton Hatter (1856-1942) Part 1 (music)

http://petefoytho.com/writing-essays-for-college/ BIS245 Week 1 iLab Devry University 3_Once enslaved near Charlestown, Virginia
Once enslaved near Charlestown, Virginia, Hamilton Hatter

ufx broker 4_seizes opportunities to learn and overcome
seizes opportunities to learn and overcome. At one college he builds young minds and even its buildings –

تداول السعودي مباشر 5_then launches another college in his beloved West Virginia
then launches another college in his beloved West Virginia again building minds and buildings.

jobba med valutahandel 6_Hatter’s descendant Joyceann Gray continues
Hatter’s descendant Joyceann Gray continues: The third event that I’d like to share with you from the Hatter family history is about Hamilton Hatter. Hamilton is the son of Rebecca and Franklin Hatter and he was born in 1856. Hamilton was a very industrious young man and did everything he could in order to make money because his desire was to gain an education He learned to do house framing, make plows – he was very, very handy. (music) But first he had to overcome.

http://sacramentomountainsradioclub.org/?hifer=%D8%A7%D9%83%D8%AA%D8%AA%D8%A7%D8%A8-%D8%A7%D8%B3%D9%87%D9%85-%D8%A7%D9%85-%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%82%D8%B1%D9%89&25a=f9 اكتتاب اسهم ام القرى 7_But first he had to overcome. Overcoming in Hamilton Hatter’s Charlestown, Va. – 1865 to 1867.
But first he had to overcome. Overcoming in Hamilton Hatter’s Charlestown, Va. – 1865 to 1867.

jobba hemma dagen 2017 8_His almost savage answers did not move me
His almost savage answers did not move me; but all the while I looked with compassion at his fine young face, and that pendant idle sleeve. (music)

فوريكس 9_and I can rejoice now in the belief that THE SCHOOL WILL GO ON
"and I can rejoice now in the belief that THE SCHOOL WILL GO ON!” (music)

10_The children were of both sexes, ranging from three to twenty years of age
The children were of both sexes, ranging from three to twenty years of age, neatly and comfortably clad, well fed, healthy, and cheerful,

11_with an uncommon array of agreeable and intelligent countenances peering over the tops of the desks
with an uncommon array of agreeable and intelligent countenances peering over the tops of the desks. (crickets, dog bark)

12_Northern journalist John Trowbridge came to Charlestown in the early summer of 1865
Northern journalist John Trowbridge came to Charlestown in the early summer of 1865, a war-worn town with its ruins and seething and

13_six months before Hatter’s school was opened there.
six months before Hatter’s school was opened there. (train sound) Trowbridge arrived at Charlestown in about May, 1865 expecting nothing in particular.

14_He came by train from Harper’s Ferry
(He came by train from Harper’s Ferry a hub of Federal army activity). (women wail)

15_Old and infirm African-Americans arrived there
Old and infirm African-Americans arrived there along with women with children, some “cut loose” by their onetime owners and they sought medical help, food and shelter. (women wail crickets)

16_Able-bodied freedmen were in demand
Able-bodied freedmen were in demand and they were paid well to get the corn and wheat planted). (train)

17_One morning I took the train up the Valley to Charlestown
One morning I took the train up the Valley to Charlestown, distant from Harper’s Ferry of eight miles. The railroad was still in the hands of the government.

18_There were military guards on the platform
There were military guards on the platforms, and about an equal mixture of Loyalists and Rebels within the cars.

19_Furloughed soldiers, returning to their regiments
Furloughed soldiers, returning to their regiments at Winchester or Staunton, occupied seats with

20_Confederate officers just out of their uniforms
Confederate officers just out of their uniforms. The strong, dark, defiant, self-satisfied face typical of the second-rate “chivalry,” and the good-natured,

21_shrewd, inquisitive physiognomy of the Yankee speculator
shrewd, inquisitive physiognomy of the Yankee speculator going to look at Southern lands,

22_were to be seen side by side, in curious contrast.
were to be seen side by side, in curious contrast. There also rode the well-dressed

23_wealthy planter, who had been to Washington to solicit pardon for his treasonable acts
wealthy planter, who had been to Washington to solicit pardon for his treasonable acts, and

24_the humble freedman returning to the home
the humble freedman returning to the home from which he had been driven by violence.(train)

25_Mothers and daughters of the first families of Virginia
Mothers and daughters of the first families of Virginia sat serene and uncomplaining in the atmosphere of mothers and daughters of late their slaves or their neighbors’, but now citizens like themselves, free to go and come, and as dearly entitled to places in the government train as the proudest dames of the land. We passed through a region of country

26_stamped all over by the devastating heel of war
stamped all over by the devastating heel of war. (raven) For miles

27_not a fence or cultivated field was visible
not a fence or cultivated field was visible.

28_It is just like this all the way up the Shenandoah Valley,
“It is just like this all the way up the Shenandoah Valley,” said a gentleman at my side, a Union man from Winchester.

29_The wealthiest people with us are now the poorest
“The wealthiest people with us are now the poorest." Harper’s Magazine Writer and Illustrator

30_David Hunter Strother, whose wife came from Charlestown, wrote
David Hunter Strother, whose wife came from Charlestown, wrote of just one such landowner who meets in a store a one-time slave of his: (banjo)

31_Not long ago a country gentleman and one of his old slaves met in a store
Not long ago a country gentleman and one of his old slaves met in a store, where they had gone to transact some business and make purchases. They had parted in 1862, but recognized and greeted each other with the cordiality of ancient friendship, instinctively the while taking stock of each others appearance and deportment. The negro was hale, sleek, and well dressed, and in settling up a smart account which stood against him on the merchants books he showed a porte monnaie plethoric with the results of a summers steady work. The master’s heart was warmed at the evident prosperity of his old servant. (banjo)

32_He used to think him drunken, lazy, and tricky
He used to think him drunken, lazy, and tricky, and had prophesied his ruin when left to his own devices. Unlike Jonah and most other prophets of evil, he was not embittered at the non-fulfillment of his predictions, but cordially invited Harry out to see the family and the old place. (banjo). The freedman’s observations had not been so satisfactory. The old master was roughly clad in ex-Confederate gray, faded, stained, threadbare, and frayed at the button-holes; his hair and beard grizzled to suit, and his face haggard and care-worn. His pocketbook resembled a dried North Carolina herring. In making his purchases he was scrutinizing and skimpy, and once

33_obscurely hinted at credit, which the shopkeeper failed to hear
obscurely hinted at credit, which the shopkeeper failed to hear. (banjo) That afternoon

34_Harry walked out to the old place
Harry walked out to the old place, and it saddened his heart to see it. The noble woodland that used to be so jealously preserved, (banjo) and was always teeming with possums and coons, had been hacked and haggled until it had nearly disappeared.

35_36_The barn was gone
The barn was gone, and only some charred and blackened stumps indicated where it once stood. The house was paint-less and dilapidated, the enclosures broken, gates off their hinges, or rudely mended with rails or boards; the shade trees worm-eaten and dying at the top, the lawn and borders hirsute with weeds and suckers. (banjo) But still, as of yore, a

37_a hospitable smoke was pouring out of the kitchen chimney
hospitable smoke was pouring out of the kitchen chimney, and the proprietor was ready with a cheerful and friendly welcome.

38_Harry respectfully dropped his hat
Harry respectfully dropped his hat upon the porch floor, while he nervously fumbled for a package in his coat pocket. "I say, Mister Charles, do you still use tabaccy ?" (The negro now carefully abstains from the master and mistress in his address.)

39_Oh yes, Harry. And that reminds me here’s a pound of tobacco
"Oh yes, Harry. And that reminds me here’s a pound of tobacco and a pipe I got for you in town. "Harry looked confounded, and then, shaking with deferential hilarity,

40_excavated a package of like character from his own pocket.
excavated a package of like character from his own pocket. (banjo) Trowbridge continued:

41_I suggested that farms, under such circumstances, should be for sale at low rates.
I suggested that farms, under such circumstances, should be for sale at low rates. "They should be; but

42_your Southern aristocrat is a monomaniac on the subject of owning land.
your Southern aristocrat is a monomaniac on the subject of owning land. He will part with his acres about as willingly as he will part with his life. But everything is being revolutionized now.

43_Northern men and northern methods are coming into the Valley as sure as water runs down hill
Northern men and northern methods are coming into the Valley as sure as water runs down hill. (train)

44_It is the greatest corn, wheat and grass country in the world
It is the greatest corn, wheat and grass country in the world. The only objection to it is that

45_in spots the limestone crops out a good deal
in spots the limestone crops out a good deal.” (train) At the end of a long hour’s ride,

46_we arrived at Charles Town
47_interest to me as the place of John Brown’s martyrdom
we arrived at Charles Town, chiefly of interest to me as the place of John Brown’s martyrdom. (music)

48_We alighted from the train on the edge of boundless unfenced fields
49_unfenced fields, into whose melancholy solitudes the desolate streets emptied themselves
We alighted from the train on the edge of boundless unfenced fields, into whose melancholy solitudes the desolate streets emptied themselves – rivers to that ocean of weeds. The town resembled to my eye some unprotected female sitting, sorrowful on the wayside,

50_in tattered and faded apparel, with unkempt tresses fallen.jpg
in tattered and faded apparel, with unkempt tresses fallen negligently about features which might once have been attractive. (music)

51_On the steps of a boarding house I found an acquaintance.jpg
52_whose countenance gleamed with pleasure “at sight,” as he said, “of a single loyal face in that nest of secession.jpg
On the steps of a boarding house I found an acquaintance whose countenance gleamed with pleasure “at sight,” as he said, “of a single loyal face in that nest of secession.”

53_He had been two or three days in the place waiting for luggage which had been miscarried.jpg
He had been two or three days in the place waiting for luggage which had been miscarried. While Jefferson County, West Virginia is still small, the sentiment toward secession throughout the County before the Civil War varied widely, with

54_the hotbed of secessionist sentiment in the area around Charlestown
the hotbed of secessionist sentiment in the area around Charlestown and adjacent large farms. (mandolin)

55_They are all Rebels here – all rebels!
“They are all Rebels here – all rebels!” he exclaimed as he took his cane and walked with me. “They are a pitiable poverty-stricken set, there is no money in the place, and scarcely anything to eat.

56_We have for breakfast salt-fish, fried potatoes and treason
We have for breakfast salt-fish, fried potatoes and treason. Fried potatoes, treason, and salt-fish for dinner. At supper, the fare is slightly varied, and we have treason, salt-fish potatoes, and a little more treason.

57_My landlady’ s daughter is Southern fire incarnate.jpg
My landlady’ s daughter is Southern fire incarnate; and she illustrates Southern politeness by abusing Northern people and the government from morning ‘till night, for my especial edification. Sometimes I venture to answer her, when she flies at me, figuratively speaking, like a cat. The women are not the only out-spoken Rebels, although they are the worst.

58_The men don’t hesitate to declare their sentiments
The men don’t hesitate to declare their sentiments, in season and out of season.” (mandolin).
My friend concluded with this figure:

59_The war feeling here is like a burning bush with a wet blanket wrapped around it
“The war feeling here is like a burning bush with a wet blanket wrapped around it. Looked at from the outside, the fire seems quenched. But just peep under the blanket and there it is, all alive and eating, eating in. The wet blanket is the present government policy; and

60_every act of conciliation shown the Rebels
every act of conciliation shown the Rebels is just letting in so much air to feed the fire.” (mandolin)

61_A short walk up into the center of town.jpg
62_John Browns trial andhanging became symbols to soldiers during the Civil War.jpg
A short walk up into the center of the town took us to the scene of John Brown’s trial. (music, gavel, wagon),

63_John Brown’s body lies a mouldering in the grave.jpg
Oh John Brown’s body lies a moulderin’ in the grave, While weep the sons of bondage whom he ventured all to save; But tho he lost his life while struggling for the slave,

64_his soul is marching on.jpg
His soul is marching on. Glory,

65_Glory Glory hallelujah.jpg
66_John Brown Hanged.jpg
glory, hallelujah (humming, drums)(eerie music) It was a consolation to see that

67_the jail had been laid in ashes.jpg
the jail had been laid in ashes, and that the

68_court-house, where the mockery of justice was performed.jpg
69_a ruin abandoned to rats and toads
court-house, where the mockery of justice was performed, was a ruin abandoned to rats and toads. (toads) Four mossy white brick pillars, still standing, supported a riddled roof, through which God’s blue sky and gracious sunshine smiled.(music) The main portion of the building had been literally torn to pieces.

70_In the floorless hall of justice.jpg
In the floorless hall of justice, rank weeds were growing. Names of Union soldiers were scrawled along the wall. No torch had been applied to the wood-work, but the work of destruction had been

71_performed by hilarious soldier boys.jpg
performed by the hands of (laughter) hilarious soldier-boys ripping up floors and pulling down laths and joists to the tune of “John Brown” – the swelling melody of the song and the accompaniment of crashing partitions, reminding the citizens who thought to have destroyed the old hero, that his soul was marching on. (eerie music,Glory, glory hallelujah). As we were taking comfort, reflecting how unexpectedly at last justice had been done at that court-house, (horse whinny,wagon) the townspeople passed on the sidewalk,

72_“daughters and sons of beauty,” for they were mostly a fine-looking, spirited class.jpg
73_a fine-looking, spirited class.jpg
“daughters and sons of beauty,” for they were mostly a fine-looking, spirited class; one of whom, at a question which I put to him, stopped quite willingly and talked with us. I have seldom seen a handsome young face, a steadier eye, or more decided pose and aplomb, neither have I ever seen the outward garment of courtesy so plumply filled out with the spirit of arrogance. His brief replies spoken with a pleasant countenance,

74_yet with short, sharp downward inflections, and were like pistol shots.jpg
yet with short, sharp downward inflections, and were like pistol shots. Very evidently the death of John Brown, and the war that came swooping down the old man’s path to avenge him, and to accomplish the work wherein he failed, were not pleasing subjects to this young southern blood.

75_and no wonder his coat had an empty sleeve.jpg
And no wonder. His coat had an empty sleeve. The arm which should have been there had been lost fighting against his country. His almost savage answers did not move me; but all the while

76_I looked with compassion at his fine young face
I looked with compassion at his fine young face, and that pendant idle sleeve. (music)

77_He had fought against his country; his country had won; and he was of those who had lost
78_all they had been madly fighting for, and more, – prosperity, prestige and power.jpg
He had fought against his country; his country had won; and he was of those who had lost, not arms and legs only, but all they had been madly fighting for, and more, – prosperity, prestige and power.

79_His beautiful South had been devastated.jpg
80_her soul drenched with the best blood
His beautiful South was devastated, and her soil drenched with the best blood of her young men. Whether regarded as a crime or a virtue, (mandolin) the folly of making war upon the mighty North was now demonstrated, and

81_the despised Yankees had proved conquerors of the chivalry of the South.jpg
82_May well your thoughts be bitter
the despised Yankees had proved conquerors of the chivalry of the South. “Well may your thoughts be bitter,” my heart said, as I thanked him for his information. (mandolin) To my surprise he seemed mollified, his answers losing their explosive quality and sharp downward inflection. He even seemed inclined to continue the conversation and as we passed we left him on the sidewalk looking after us wistfully, as if the spirit working within him had still no word to say different from any he had yet spoken. What his secret thoughts were, standing there with his dangling sleeve, it would be interesting to know. (mandolin)

83_Walking through the town we came to.jpg
84_Here we engaged a bright young colored girl.jpg
Walking through town we came to other barren and open fields on the further side. Here we engaged a bright young colored girl to guide us to the spot where John Brown’s gallows stood. (music) She led us into the wilderness of weeds waist-high to her as she tramped on, parting them before her with her hands. The country all around us lay utterly desolate without enclosures, and without cultivation. We seemed to be striking out into the rolling prairies of the West, except that these fields of ripening and fading weeds had not the summer freshness of the prairie-grass. A few scattering groves skirted them; and here and there a fenceless road drew its winding, dusty line away over the arid hills.

85_“This is about where it was,” said the girl
“This is about where it was,” said the girl, after searching some time among the tall weeds. (music)

http://craigpauldesign.co.uk/?izi=%D8%A3%D8%B3%D9%87%D9%85-%D8%A7%D8%B9%D9%85%D8%A7%D8%B1&869=8e أسهم اعمار Gwen Ifill
african american journalist
كم سعر اسهم بنك وربه Image by Center for American Progress
In The Breakthrough, veteran journalist Gwen Ifill surveys the American political landscape, shedding new light on the impact of Barack Obama’s stunning presidential victory and introducing the emerging young African-American politicians forging a bold new path to political power.

Ifill argues that the black political structure formed during the Civil Rights movement is giving way to a generation of men and women who are the direct beneficiaries of the struggles of the 1960s. She offers incisive, detailed profiles of such prominent leaders as Newark Mayor Cory Booker, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, and U.S. Congressman Artur Davis of Alabama. Drawing on exclusive interviews with power brokers such as President Obama, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, Vernon Jordan, the Reverend Jesse Jackson, his son Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr., and many others, as well as her own razor-sharp observations and analysis of such issues as generational conflict, the race-gender clash, and the "black enough" conundrum, Ifill shows why this is a pivotal moment in American history.

The Breakthrough is an essential foundation for understanding the future of American democracy in the age of Obama. Please join the Center for American Progress for a provocative discussion around this remarkable look at contemporary politics.

For more on this event, please see:
www.americanprogress.org/events/2009/02/breakthrough.html

handelsbanken forex avgift Carter G. Woodson
african american journalist
اخر اخبار الفوركس Image by dbking
Carter Godwin Woodson (b. December 19, 1875, New Canton, Buckingham County, Virginia — d. April 3, 1950, Washington, D.C.) was an African American historian, author, journalist and the founder of Black History Month. He is considered the first to conduct a scholarly effort to popularize the value of Black History. He recognized and acted upon the importance of a people having an awareness and knowledge of their contributions to humanity and left behind an impressive legacy. He was a member of the first black fraternity Sigma Pi Phi and a member of Omega Psi Phi as well.

Early life
Woodson was the son of former slaves James and Eliza Riddle Woodson. His father had helped the Union soldiers during the Civil War, and afterwards moved his family to West Virginia when he heard they were building a high school for blacks in Huntington. Coming from a large, poor family, Carter could not regularly attend such schools, but through self-instruction he was able to master the fundamentals of common school subjects by the time he was 17.

Ambitious for more education Woodson went to Fayette County to earn a living as a miner in the coal fields, but was only able to devote a few months each year to his schooling. In 1895 at the age of twenty, Carter entered Douglass High School where he received his diploma in less than two years. From 1897 to 1900, Carter G. Woodson began teaching in Fayette County. In 1900, he became the principal of Douglass High School. Woodson finally received his Bachelor of Literature degree from Berea College in Kentucky. From 1903 to 1907 he was a school supervisor in the Philippines. He then attended the University of Chicago where he received his M.A. in 1908, and in 1912 he received his Ph.D. in history from Harvard University.

In 1915, Woodson and Jesse E. Moorland co-founded the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

By this time convinced that the role of his own people in American history and in the history of other cultures was being either ignored or misrepresented among scholars, Woodson realized the need for special research into the neglected past of the Negro. The Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, founded September 9, 1915, in Chicago, was the result of this conviction. In the same year appeared one of his most scholarly books, The Education of the Negro Prior to 1861. Other books followed: A Century of Negro Migration (1918), The History of the Negro Church (1927), and The Negro in Our History, the last in numerous editions and revised by Charles H. Wesley after Woodson’s death in 1950. In January 1916 Woodson began the publication of the scholarly Journal of Negro History, which, despite depressions, loss of support from foundations and two World Wars, has never missed an issue. In 2002 it was renamed the Journal of African-American History, and continues to be published by the Association for the Study of African American History (ASAAH).

The NAACP
During this time Woodson became affiliated with the recently organized Washington, D.C. branch of the NAACP, and its Chairman, Archibald Grimke. On January 28, 1915, he wrote a letter to Grimke expressing his dissatisfaction with the way things were going. Woodson made two proposals in this letter:

That the branch secure an office for a center to which persons may report whatever concerns the Negro race may have, and from which the Association may extend its operations into every part of the city; That a canvasser be appointed to enlist members and obtain subscriptions for The Crisis, the NAACP publication edited by W.E.B. DuBois. Dr. Woodson then added the daring proposal of "diverting patronage from business establishments which do not treat races alike." He wrote that he would cooperate as one of the twenty-five effective canvassers, adding that he would pay the rent for the office for one month. The NAACP did not welcome Dr. Woodson’s ideas.

In a letter dated March 18, 1915, in response to a letter from Grimke regarding his proposals, Woodson wrote,

I am not afraid of being sued by white businessmen. In fact, I should welcome such a law suit. It would do the cause much good. Let us banish fear. We have been in this mental state for three centuries. I am a radical. I am ready to act, if I can find brave men to help me. Apparently, this difference of opinion with Grimke contributed to the termination of Woodson’s short-lived affiliation with the NAACP.

On September 9, 1915, Dr. Woodson met in Chicago with Alexander L. Jackson, Executive Secretary of the new Negro YMCA branch. In addition to Woodson and Jackson, three other men were present: George C. Hall, W. B. Hargrove, and J. E. Stamps. At this meeting they formed the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, and appointed Dr. Woodson Executive Director, a post he held until his death. The early years of the Association were difficult times, but it did not deter Woodson because on January 1, 1916, he alone began to publish the Journal of Negro History, a quarterly publication. He distributed the first edition on his own initiative. The publishing of the Journal coincided with the year of the arrival of Marcus Garvey. In 1926, Woodson single-handedly pioneered the celebration of "Negro History Week", the second week in February, which has since been extended to the entire month of February. Because of Woodson’s belief in self-reliance and racial respect, it is only natural that the paths of Dr. Woodson and the Hon. Marcus Garvey would cross; their views were very similar. Woodson became a regular columnist for Garvey’s weekly Negro World.

Dr. Woodson’s political activism placed him at the center of activity and was in contact with many black intellectuals and activists between the 1920s and 1940s. He corresponded with individuals such as W.E.B. DuBois, John E. Bruce, Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, Hubert H. Harrison, and T. Thomas Fortune among others. Even with the monumental duties connected with the Association, Woodson still found time to write extensive and scholarly works such as The History of the Negro Church (1922), The Mis-Education of the Negro (1933), and many other books which continue to have wide readership today.

He was never one to shy away from a controversial subject, & utilized the pages of Negro World to contribute to various fashionable debates. One of these debates was on West Indian-African American relations. Woodson summarized that "the West Indian Negro is free." He felt that West Indian societies had been more successful at properly dedicating the necessary amounts of time & resources needed to realisticly educate and genuinely emancipate people. These opinions were the result of observing and approving of the efforts on the part of the West Indians to inject Black materials into their school curricula.

Woodson was often ostracized by many African-American educators and intellectuals of the time because of his insistence on inviting special attention to one’s race. At the time, these educators felt that it was wrong to teach or understand African-American history as in any way separate from a general (usually Eurocentric) view of American history. According to these educators, "Negroes" were simply Americans, darker skinned, but with no history a part from that of any other. Thus Woodson’s efforts to get Black culture and history into the curricula of institutions (even Historically Black ones) were often unsuccessful.

Woodson’s legacy
Woodson remained focused on his work throughout his life, never being deterred by the efforts of others. Many see him as a man of vision and understanding. Although Dr. Woodson was among the ranks of the educated few, he did not feel particularly sentimental to elite educational institutions. The Association which he started in 1915 remains today, with the Journal of African American History still published as a quarterly journal.

Dr. Woodson’s other far-reaching activities includes the organization in 1920 of the Associated Publishers, the oldest African American publishing company in the United States, which made possible the publication of books concerning blacks which were not at that time acceptable to many publishers; the establishment of Negro History Week in 1926 (now known as Black History Month); and the initial publication of the Negro History Bulletin, published continuously by the Association since 1937, and originally created for teachers in elementary and high school grades. Woodson also influenced the direction and subsidizing of research in African American history by the Association, and wrote numerous articles, monographs and books on Blacks. The Negro in Our History reached its eleventh edition in 1966, when it had sold more than 90,000 copies.

Dr. Woodson’s most cherished ambition, a six-volume Encyclopedia Africana, lay incomplete at the time of his death on April 3, 1950 at the age of 74. He is buried at Lincoln Memorial Cemetery in Suitland-Silver Hill, Maryland.

In 1992, the Library of Congress held an exhibition entitled "Moving Back Barriers: The Legacy of Carter G. Woodson". Woodson donated 5,000 items from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries to the Library. Dorothy Porter Wesley stated that "Woodson would wrap up his publications, take them to the post office and have dinner at the YMCA". He would teasingly decline her dinner invitations saying, "No, you are trying to marry me off. I am married to my work".

His Washington, D.C. home has been preserved as the Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site.

Hamilton Hatter's Tense Charlestown, WV 1865-1867

With generous, community-minded support from American Public University System. (The sentiments in this production do not in any way reflect modern-day policies of APUS). More at http://apus.edu

Actor:
Jim Surkamp
Expert Joyceann Gray, herself.

Musicians:
Shana Aisenberg - copyright-holder banjo, mandolin (“Lorena”) (shanasongs.com)
Cam Millar - Cornfields, Big Circle (cammillar.com)

Kevin Williams - eerie synthesizer composition during courthouse segment - Railroad music - Dave Hellyer, harmonica; Joe Bourgeois, guitar; Kevin Williams, drums; Kelley Cornelius, percussion.

"My Heart is in the Mountains" from Lantern in a Poet's Garden, Poem by Daniel Bedinger Lucas (public domain) Music by Terry Tucker, c (the copyright symbol) 2010, GHF Music, www.terrytucker.net - John Brown's body [sound recording] by J. Weldon Norris Chorale; Washington, D.C., 2003. With permission from the James Weldon Norris Chorale.


Sound FX:
raven - Cornell Ornithological Laboratory
wagons, laughing men, crackling fire, horse whinny, dogs, pig squeal - from “free sfx.uk.com”


Main References:

Trowbridge, John T. (1866). “The South: a tour of its battlefields and ruined cities, a journey through the desolated states, and talks with the people: being a description of the present state of the country – its agriculture – railroads – business and finances.” Hartford, Conn., L. Stebbins.

Crayon, Porte. (Strother, David H.) “Our Negro Schools” Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, New York, NY: Harper and Bros. Volume 49 Issue 292 (September, 1874). pp. 457-468.


Image Credits:

A Freedman’s Bureau agent - Harper's Weekly, July 25, 1868, p. 473.

Godey’s Fashions for September, 1862

David Hunter Strother at The Strother Collection of West Virginia University: “September 13, 1858,” “Martinsburg October 2nd, 1859,” “Ruins of the Old Academy at Martinsburg January 18th 1876,” “Untitled (Young Freedwoman),””Sir John’s Road May, 1851,” “The Bath Keeper,” “Baltimore, March 14, 1860 - (Tea kettle, cup); (Old plantation owner in text) “Artist’s Excursion Baltimore & Ohio Railroad;” (Owner’s former enslaved person); “Milby Stephenson.”

“Independence (Squire Jack Porter)” 1858 - by Frank Blackwell Mayer

“Past and Present, No. 2 1858” - by Augustus Leopold Egg

“The Story Teller of the Camp” (1861-1865) - by Eastman Johnson

Paintings by Winslow Homer: “Cornfield” - 1873; “The Bright Side” - 1865; “Prisoners from the Front” - 1866; “Defiance - Inviting a Shot Before Petersburg” - 1865;” “Veteran in a New Field.”


Brown, Howell S. “Map of Jefferson County, Virginia From Actual Surveys With Farm Limits, 1852.”

From New York Illustrated News:
“Arrival of Mrs. Brown in Charlestown, Accompanied by Capt. Moore, and an Escort, December 1, 1859” Pub. December 17, 1859; “The Procession to the Scaffold, December 2, 1859,” Pub. December 17, 1859; “Execution of John Brown.” Pub. December 10, 1859.


From Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, December 17, 1859: “John Brown Riding on his Coffin to the Place of Execution;” “John Brown Ascending the Scaffold Preparatory to Being Hanged;” “The Jail in Charlestown that held John Brown and his Raiders;” From Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, November 19, 1859: “View of Charlestown.”

Harper’s New Monthly Magazine: Strother, David H., “Personal Recollections of the Civil War.” (May, 1867), p. 716; Strother, David H., "Virginia Illustrated." (Aug., 1855), p. 296; Crayon, Porte “Our Negro Schools,” (September 1874), p. 458.


Harper's Weekly, November 12, 1859: "The Arraignment;” “Trial of John Brown.”

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buel (Ed.). “Battles and Leaders″. (1887): finding a skull in a field, Vol. 2, p. 347; plough in a field, Vol. 1, p. 216; crows over a field, Vol. 1, p. 217; Ross House, Vol. 3, p. 637.


From King, Edward. (1875). “The Great South; A Record of Journeys in Louisiana, Texas, the Indian Territory, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland:” Illustrated by Champney, James Wells. Hartford, Conn. American Publishing Co. Print: p. 99 - train car (inside); p. 659 - food to people in train cars; p. 649 - Virginia corn shed.


Man plowing by James E. Taylor - Library of Congress

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