Tag Archives: 2014

Summer holiday 2014

Check out these FIFA 15 images:

forex bank kreditkort Summer holiday 2014
FIFA 15
Image by F.d.W.
Summer holiday 2014
In and around Berlin Germany

Berlin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article is about the capital of Germany. For other uses, see Berlin (disambiguation).

Berlin

State of Germany
Clockwise: Charlottenburg Palace, Fernsehturm Berlin, Reichstag building, Berlin Cathedral, Alte Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Platz and Brandenburg Gate.
Clockwise: Charlottenburg Palace, Fernsehturm Berlin, Reichstag building, Berlin Cathedral, Alte Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Platz and Brandenburg Gate.

Flag of Berlin
Flag Coat of arms of Berlin
Coat of arms

Location within European Union and Germany
Location within European Union and Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°23′ECoordinates: 52°31′N 13°23′E

Country
Germany

Government

• Governing Mayor
Michael Müller (SPD)

• Governing parties
SPD / CDU

• Votes in Bundesrat
4 (of 69)

Area

• City
891.85 km2 (344.35 sq mi)

Elevation
34 m (112 ft)

Population (December 2013)[1]

• City
3,517,424

• Density
3,900/km2 (10,000/sq mi)

Demonym
Berliner

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

• Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

Postal code(s)
10115–14199

Area code(s)
030

ISO 3166 code
DE-BE

Vehicle registration
B[2]

GDP/ Nominal
€109.2 billion (2013) [3]

NUTS Region
DE3

Website
berlin.de

Berlin (/bərˈlɪn/; German pronunciation: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn] ( listen)) is the capital of Germany and one of the 16 states of Germany. With a population of 3.5 million people,[4] Berlin is Germany’s largest city. It is the second most populous city proper and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union.[5] Located in northeastern Germany on the River Spree, it is the center of the Berlin-Brandenburg Metropolitan Region, which has about 4.5 million residents from over 180 nations.[6][7][8][9] Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. Around one third of the city’s area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers and lakes.[10]

First documented in the 13th century, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933) and the Third Reich (1933–1945).[11] Berlin in the 1920s was the third largest municipality in the world.[12] After World War II, the city was divided; East Berlin became the capital of East Germany while West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989).[13] Following German reunification in 1990, the city was once more designated as the capital of all Germany, hosting 158 foreign embassies.[14]

Berlin is a world city of culture, politics, media, and science.[15][16][17][18] Its economy is based on high-tech firms and the service sector, encompassing a diverse range of creative industries, research facilities, media corporations, and convention venues.[19][20] Berlin serves as a continental hub for air and rail traffic and has a highly complex public transportation network. The metropolis is a popular tourist destination.[21] Significant industries also include IT, pharmaceuticals, biomedical engineering, clean tech, biotechnology, construction, and electronics.

Modern Berlin is home to renowned universities, orchestras, museums, entertainment venues, and is host to many sporting events.[22] Its urban setting has made it a sought-after location for international film productions.[23] The city is well known for its festivals, diverse architecture, nightlife, contemporary arts, and a high quality of living.[24] Over the last decade Berlin has seen the upcoming of a cosmopolitan entrepreneurial scene.[25]

20th to 21st centuries[edit]

Street, Berlin (1913) by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
After 1910 Berlin had become a fertile ground for the German Expressionist movement. In fields such as architecture, painting and cinema new forms of artistic styles were invented. At the end of World War I in 1918, a republic was proclaimed by Philipp Scheidemann at the Reichstag building. In 1920, the Greater Berlin Act incorporated dozens of suburban cities, villages, and estates around Berlin into an expanded city. The act increased the area of Berlin from 66 to 883 km2 (25 to 341 sq mi). The population almost doubled and Berlin had a population of around four million. During the Weimar era, Berlin underwent political unrest due to economic uncertainties, but also became a renowned center of the Roaring Twenties. The metropolis experienced its heyday as a major world capital and was known for its leadership roles in science, the humanities, city planning, film, higher education, government, and industries. Albert Einstein rose to public prominence during his years in Berlin, being awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1921.

Berlin in ruins after World War II (Potsdamer Platz, 1945).
In 1933, Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party came to power. NSDAP rule effectively destroyed Berlin’s Jewish community, which had numbered 160,000, representing one-third of all Jews in the country. Berlin’s Jewish population fell to about 80,000 as a result of emigration between 1933 and 1939. After Kristallnacht in 1938, thousands of the city’s persecuted groups were imprisoned in the nearby Sachsenhausen concentration camp or, starting in early 1943, were shipped to death camps, such as Auschwitz.[39] During World War II, large parts of Berlin were destroyed in the 1943–45 air raids and during the Battle of Berlin. Around 125,000 civilians were killed.[40] After the end of the war in Europe in 1945, Berlin received large numbers of refugees from the Eastern provinces. The victorious powers divided the city into four sectors, analogous to the occupation zones into which Germany was divided. The sectors of the Western Allies (the United States, the United Kingdom and France) formed West Berlin, while the Soviet sector formed East Berlin.[41]

The Berlin Wall in 1986, painted on the western side. People crossing the so-called "death strip" on the eastern side were at risk of being shot.
All four Allies shared administrative responsibilities for Berlin. However, in 1948, when the Western Allies extended the currency reform in the Western zones of Germany to the three western sectors of Berlin, the Soviet Union imposed a blockade on the access routes to and from West Berlin, which lay entirely inside Soviet-controlled territory. The Berlin airlift, conducted by the three western Allies, overcame this blockade by supplying food and other supplies to the city from June 1948 to May 1949.[42] In 1949, the Federal Republic of Germany was founded in West Germany and eventually included all of the American, British, and French zones, excluding those three countries’ zones in Berlin, while the Marxist-Leninist German Democratic Republic was proclaimed in East Germany. West Berlin officially remained an occupied city, but it politically was aligned with the Federal Republic of Germany despite West Berlin’s geographic isolation. Airline service to West Berlin was granted only to American, British, and French airlines.

The fall of the Berlin Wall on 9 November 1989. On 3 October 1990, the German reunification process was formally finished.
The founding of the two German states increased Cold War tensions. West Berlin was surrounded by East German territory, and East Germany proclaimed the Eastern part as its capital, a move that was not recognized by the western powers. East Berlin included most of the historic center of the city. The West German government established itself in Bonn.[43] In 1961, East Germany began the building of the Berlin Wall between East and West Berlin, and events escalated to a tank standoff at Checkpoint Charlie. West Berlin was now de facto a part of West Germany with a unique legal status, while East Berlin was de facto a part of East Germany. John F. Kennedy gave his "Ich bin ein Berliner" – speech in 1963 underlining the US support for the Western part of the city. Berlin was completely divided. Although it was possible for Westerners to pass from one to the other side through strictly controlled checkpoints, for most Easterners travel to West Berlin or West Germany prohibited. In 1971, a Four-Power agreement guaranteed access to and from West Berlin by car or train through East Germany.[44]

In 1989, with the end of the Cold War and pressure from the East German population, the Berlin Wall fell on 9 November and was subsequently mostly demolished. Today, the East Side Gallery preserves a large portion of the Wall. On 3 October 1990, the two parts of Germany were reunified as the Federal Republic of Germany, and Berlin again became the official German capital. In 1991, the German Parliament, the Bundestag, voted to move the seat of the (West) German capital from Bonn to Berlin, which was completed in 1999. Berlin’s 2001 administrative reform merged several districts. The number of boroughs was reduced from 23 to twelve. In 2006 the FIFA World Cup Final was held in Berlin.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin

forex betala med kreditkort Summer holiday 2014
FIFA 15
Image by F.d.W.
Summer holiday 2014
In and around Berlin Germany

Berlin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article is about the capital of Germany. For other uses, see Berlin (disambiguation).

Berlin

State of Germany
Clockwise: Charlottenburg Palace, Fernsehturm Berlin, Reichstag building, Berlin Cathedral, Alte Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Platz and Brandenburg Gate.
Clockwise: Charlottenburg Palace, Fernsehturm Berlin, Reichstag building, Berlin Cathedral, Alte Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Platz and Brandenburg Gate.

Flag of Berlin
Flag Coat of arms of Berlin
Coat of arms

Location within European Union and Germany
Location within European Union and Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°23′ECoordinates: 52°31′N 13°23′E

Country
Germany

Government

• Governing Mayor
Michael Müller (SPD)

• Governing parties
SPD / CDU

• Votes in Bundesrat
4 (of 69)

Area

• City
891.85 km2 (344.35 sq mi)

Elevation
34 m (112 ft)

Population (December 2013)[1]

• City
3,517,424

• Density
3,900/km2 (10,000/sq mi)

Demonym
Berliner

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

• Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

Postal code(s)
10115–14199

Area code(s)
030

ISO 3166 code
DE-BE

Vehicle registration
B[2]

GDP/ Nominal
€109.2 billion (2013) [3]

NUTS Region
DE3

Website
berlin.de

Berlin (/bərˈlɪn/; German pronunciation: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn] ( listen)) is the capital of Germany and one of the 16 states of Germany. With a population of 3.5 million people,[4] Berlin is Germany’s largest city. It is the second most populous city proper and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union.[5] Located in northeastern Germany on the River Spree, it is the center of the Berlin-Brandenburg Metropolitan Region, which has about 4.5 million residents from over 180 nations.[6][7][8][9] Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. Around one third of the city’s area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers and lakes.[10]

First documented in the 13th century, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933) and the Third Reich (1933–1945).[11] Berlin in the 1920s was the third largest municipality in the world.[12] After World War II, the city was divided; East Berlin became the capital of East Germany while West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989).[13] Following German reunification in 1990, the city was once more designated as the capital of all Germany, hosting 158 foreign embassies.[14]

Berlin is a world city of culture, politics, media, and science.[15][16][17][18] Its economy is based on high-tech firms and the service sector, encompassing a diverse range of creative industries, research facilities, media corporations, and convention venues.[19][20] Berlin serves as a continental hub for air and rail traffic and has a highly complex public transportation network. The metropolis is a popular tourist destination.[21] Significant industries also include IT, pharmaceuticals, biomedical engineering, clean tech, biotechnology, construction, and electronics.

Modern Berlin is home to renowned universities, orchestras, museums, entertainment venues, and is host to many sporting events.[22] Its urban setting has made it a sought-after location for international film productions.[23] The city is well known for its festivals, diverse architecture, nightlife, contemporary arts, and a high quality of living.[24] Over the last decade Berlin has seen the upcoming of a cosmopolitan entrepreneurial scene.[25]

20th to 21st centuries[edit]

Street, Berlin (1913) by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
After 1910 Berlin had become a fertile ground for the German Expressionist movement. In fields such as architecture, painting and cinema new forms of artistic styles were invented. At the end of World War I in 1918, a republic was proclaimed by Philipp Scheidemann at the Reichstag building. In 1920, the Greater Berlin Act incorporated dozens of suburban cities, villages, and estates around Berlin into an expanded city. The act increased the area of Berlin from 66 to 883 km2 (25 to 341 sq mi). The population almost doubled and Berlin had a population of around four million. During the Weimar era, Berlin underwent political unrest due to economic uncertainties, but also became a renowned center of the Roaring Twenties. The metropolis experienced its heyday as a major world capital and was known for its leadership roles in science, the humanities, city planning, film, higher education, government, and industries. Albert Einstein rose to public prominence during his years in Berlin, being awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1921.

Berlin in ruins after World War II (Potsdamer Platz, 1945).
In 1933, Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party came to power. NSDAP rule effectively destroyed Berlin’s Jewish community, which had numbered 160,000, representing one-third of all Jews in the country. Berlin’s Jewish population fell to about 80,000 as a result of emigration between 1933 and 1939. After Kristallnacht in 1938, thousands of the city’s persecuted groups were imprisoned in the nearby Sachsenhausen concentration camp or, starting in early 1943, were shipped to death camps, such as Auschwitz.[39] During World War II, large parts of Berlin were destroyed in the 1943–45 air raids and during the Battle of Berlin. Around 125,000 civilians were killed.[40] After the end of the war in Europe in 1945, Berlin received large numbers of refugees from the Eastern provinces. The victorious powers divided the city into four sectors, analogous to the occupation zones into which Germany was divided. The sectors of the Western Allies (the United States, the United Kingdom and France) formed West Berlin, while the Soviet sector formed East Berlin.[41]

The Berlin Wall in 1986, painted on the western side. People crossing the so-called "death strip" on the eastern side were at risk of being shot.
All four Allies shared administrative responsibilities for Berlin. However, in 1948, when the Western Allies extended the currency reform in the Western zones of Germany to the three western sectors of Berlin, the Soviet Union imposed a blockade on the access routes to and from West Berlin, which lay entirely inside Soviet-controlled territory. The Berlin airlift, conducted by the three western Allies, overcame this blockade by supplying food and other supplies to the city from June 1948 to May 1949.[42] In 1949, the Federal Republic of Germany was founded in West Germany and eventually included all of the American, British, and French zones, excluding those three countries’ zones in Berlin, while the Marxist-Leninist German Democratic Republic was proclaimed in East Germany. West Berlin officially remained an occupied city, but it politically was aligned with the Federal Republic of Germany despite West Berlin’s geographic isolation. Airline service to West Berlin was granted only to American, British, and French airlines.

The fall of the Berlin Wall on 9 November 1989. On 3 October 1990, the German reunification process was formally finished.
The founding of the two German states increased Cold War tensions. West Berlin was surrounded by East German territory, and East Germany proclaimed the Eastern part as its capital, a move that was not recognized by the western powers. East Berlin included most of the historic center of the city. The West German government established itself in Bonn.[43] In 1961, East Germany began the building of the Berlin Wall between East and West Berlin, and events escalated to a tank standoff at Checkpoint Charlie. West Berlin was now de facto a part of West Germany with a unique legal status, while East Berlin was de facto a part of East Germany. John F. Kennedy gave his "Ich bin ein Berliner" – speech in 1963 underlining the US support for the Western part of the city. Berlin was completely divided. Although it was possible for Westerners to pass from one to the other side through strictly controlled checkpoints, for most Easterners travel to West Berlin or West Germany prohibited. In 1971, a Four-Power agreement guaranteed access to and from West Berlin by car or train through East Germany.[44]

In 1989, with the end of the Cold War and pressure from the East German population, the Berlin Wall fell on 9 November and was subsequently mostly demolished. Today, the East Side Gallery preserves a large portion of the Wall. On 3 October 1990, the two parts of Germany were reunified as the Federal Republic of Germany, and Berlin again became the official German capital. In 1991, the German Parliament, the Bundestag, voted to move the seat of the (West) German capital from Bonn to Berlin, which was completed in 1999. Berlin’s 2001 administrative reform merged several districts. The number of boroughs was reduced from 23 to twelve. In 2006 the FIFA World Cup Final was held in Berlin.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin

Mille Miglia 2014

A few nice bernard turner images I found:

ماهي افضل شركات الاسهم السعودية Mille Miglia 2014
bernard turner
Image by jaguarmena
Jaguar Heritage Racing is tackling the legendary Mille Miglia classic car endurance event from 15-18 May with a line-up of top-name drivers, which covers over 1,000 gruelling miles from Brescia-Rome-Brescia in ten of the most revered and sought-after historic Jaguar cars ever produced.

forex handel wiki Mille Miglia 2014
bernard turner
Image by jaguarmena
Jaguar Heritage Racing is tackling the legendary Mille Miglia classic car endurance event from 15-18 May with a line-up of top-name drivers, which covers over 1,000 gruelling miles from Brescia-Rome-Brescia in ten of the most revered and sought-after historic Jaguar cars ever produced

Far Cry 4 Gameplay – E3 2014 Sony Press Conference

Check out the new gameplay from Far Cry 4 from the Sony Press Conference.
Visit all of our channels:
Features & Reviews – http://www.youtube.com/user/gamespot
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http://thebell-hotel.org/?minus=%D8%AA%D8%AF%D8%A7%D9%88%D9%84%D8%A7%D8%AA-%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%81%D9%88%D8%B1%D9%83%D8%B3&9e6=1b تداولات الفوركس Video Rating: / 5

Tom Clancy’s The Division E3 2014 Official Cinematic Trailer [US]

Tom Clancy's The Division E3 2014 Official Cinematic Trailer [US]

Tragedy has come to New York City. It’s hard to see something you love destroy itself and fall apart. But someone needs to be there to pick it up, to push back. Your purpose lies amongst all of this pain. You will have to fight, to save, to put it all back together. You are the hope of New York City.

Witness the beginning of the devastating outbreak that brought New York to ruin. Things look bleak, but we haven’t lost yet. There’s still time to protect those that remain and bring order to a destroyed world.

This trailer is the latest in a series of trailers for Tom Clancy’s The Division. To see more videos about The Division, check out the full playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBnrd5k2F2IOtuNub1Q5-oZjKkiLjy4cY

Please SUBSCRIBE and visit our official channels for exclusive access and the latest information on Tom Clancy’s The Division:
http://www.thedivisiongame.com
https://www.facebook.com/TheDivisionGame

About Tom Clancy’s The Division:
We live in a complex world. The more advanced it gets, the more vulnerable it becomes. We’ve created a house of cards. Remove just one, and everything falls apart.

On Black Friday, a devastating pandemic sweeps through New York City, and one by one, basic services fail. In only days, without food or water, society collapses into chaos. The Division, an autonomous unit of tactical agents, is activated. Leading seemingly ordinary lives among us, these agents are trained to operate independently in order to save society.
When society falls, your mission begins.

KEY FEATURES
• Take Back New York: Welcome to a next-gen experience in a persistent and dynamic environment where exploration and player progression are essential. Teaming up with other Division agents, your mission is to restore order, investigate the source of the virus, and take back New York.

• A Living, Breathing World
Enter a universe where time of day and weather conditions impact your gaming experience. Use the environment for strategic advantage to dominate fights and ambush your enemies. Utilize your gas mask to provide protection from the virus, and upgrade it to enter the most highly contaminated areas.

• Urban Jungle
New York City is being overrun by hostile groups that are trying to take advantage of the crisis. One such group is the Cleaners, who travel throughout the city wherever the contagion levels rise. Wearing hazmat suits and wielding flamethrowers, the Cleaners leave nothing but ash in their wake.

• The Agents of The Division
Trained to act independently from any chain of command, the Agents are autonomous and adaptive, working alone or in small groups. They are the last line of defense, activated when all else fails to save what remains.

• Gear Up
Harness state-of-the-art technology, both networked and prototype, as a member of The Division. Loot fallen enemies and upgrade your gear. Customize your character and your backpack, your lifeline in the event of a collapse. Communicate with other agents at all times with your smartwatch and customize and level up your weapons. The choices you make will help to forge a recovery, or plunge the city deeper into chaos.

• Game-Changing Skills
Choose and upgrade your skills smartly and synergize with your teammates to increase your chances of winning in combat. Use the ECHO, a data collection tool that renders moments frozen in time, to learn valuable information about your immediate environment and find hidden loot, and to help uncover the truth behind the pandemic.

• Social Seamless Multiplayer
Team up with friends to seamlessly take down your enemies and achieve group objectives. Raise the security and morale levels of the surviving citizens of New York to unlock and secure a base of operations, and fight through a city where danger can come from anywhere, and anyone, at any moment.

• Revolutionary Companion Gaming
Join your friends in real-time gameplay on your tablet. The app gives you a bird’s-eye view of the battlefield and the ability to aid your allies in combat by attacking enemies or identifying targets and raining destruction down on your enemies.

• Snowdrop Engine
Powered by the fully next-gen Snowdrop engine, Tom Clancy’s The Division sets a new bar in video game realism and open world rendering. Experience a chaotic and devastating New York like you’ve never seen before.

© 2014 Ubisoft Entertainment. All Rights Reserved. Tom Clancy’s, The Division logo, the Soldier Icon, Ubisoft, and the Ubisoft logo are trademarks of Ubisoft Entertainment in the US and/or other countries.

http://www.osha-courses.com/?komandor=www-fx-arabia-com www fx arabia com Video Rating: / 5

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt – The Sword of Destiny E3 2014 Trailer

Check out the Sword of Destiny E3 2014 trailer for The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt.

Follow The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt at GameSpot.com!
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Summer holiday 2014

A few nice FIFA 15 images I found:

http://karatewa.com/?vagu=%D9%85%D9%88%D8%A7%D8%B9%D9%8A%D8%AF-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D9%85%D9%84-%D9%81%D9%8A-%D8%B3%D9%88%D9%82-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A7%D8%B3%D9%87%D9%85-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B3%D8%B9%D9%88%D8%AF%D9%8A&b0c=16 مواعيد العمل في سوق الاسهم السعودي Summer holiday 2014
FIFA 15
Image by F.d.W.
Summer holiday 2014
In and around Berlin Germany

Berlin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article is about the capital of Germany. For other uses, see Berlin (disambiguation).

Berlin

State of Germany
Clockwise: Charlottenburg Palace, Fernsehturm Berlin, Reichstag building, Berlin Cathedral, Alte Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Platz and Brandenburg Gate.
Clockwise: Charlottenburg Palace, Fernsehturm Berlin, Reichstag building, Berlin Cathedral, Alte Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Platz and Brandenburg Gate.

Flag of Berlin
Flag Coat of arms of Berlin
Coat of arms

Location within European Union and Germany
Location within European Union and Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°23′ECoordinates: 52°31′N 13°23′E

Country
Germany

Government

• Governing Mayor
Michael Müller (SPD)

• Governing parties
SPD / CDU

• Votes in Bundesrat
4 (of 69)

Area

• City
891.85 km2 (344.35 sq mi)

Elevation
34 m (112 ft)

Population (December 2013)[1]

• City
3,517,424

• Density
3,900/km2 (10,000/sq mi)

Demonym
Berliner

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

• Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

Postal code(s)
10115–14199

Area code(s)
030

ISO 3166 code
DE-BE

Vehicle registration
B[2]

GDP/ Nominal
€109.2 billion (2013) [3]

NUTS Region
DE3

Website
berlin.de

Berlin (/bərˈlɪn/; German pronunciation: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn] ( listen)) is the capital of Germany and one of the 16 states of Germany. With a population of 3.5 million people,[4] Berlin is Germany’s largest city. It is the second most populous city proper and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union.[5] Located in northeastern Germany on the River Spree, it is the center of the Berlin-Brandenburg Metropolitan Region, which has about 4.5 million residents from over 180 nations.[6][7][8][9] Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. Around one third of the city’s area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers and lakes.[10]

First documented in the 13th century, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933) and the Third Reich (1933–1945).[11] Berlin in the 1920s was the third largest municipality in the world.[12] After World War II, the city was divided; East Berlin became the capital of East Germany while West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989).[13] Following German reunification in 1990, the city was once more designated as the capital of all Germany, hosting 158 foreign embassies.[14]

Berlin is a world city of culture, politics, media, and science.[15][16][17][18] Its economy is based on high-tech firms and the service sector, encompassing a diverse range of creative industries, research facilities, media corporations, and convention venues.[19][20] Berlin serves as a continental hub for air and rail traffic and has a highly complex public transportation network. The metropolis is a popular tourist destination.[21] Significant industries also include IT, pharmaceuticals, biomedical engineering, clean tech, biotechnology, construction, and electronics.

Modern Berlin is home to renowned universities, orchestras, museums, entertainment venues, and is host to many sporting events.[22] Its urban setting has made it a sought-after location for international film productions.[23] The city is well known for its festivals, diverse architecture, nightlife, contemporary arts, and a high quality of living.[24] Over the last decade Berlin has seen the upcoming of a cosmopolitan entrepreneurial scene.[25]

20th to 21st centuries[edit]

Street, Berlin (1913) by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
After 1910 Berlin had become a fertile ground for the German Expressionist movement. In fields such as architecture, painting and cinema new forms of artistic styles were invented. At the end of World War I in 1918, a republic was proclaimed by Philipp Scheidemann at the Reichstag building. In 1920, the Greater Berlin Act incorporated dozens of suburban cities, villages, and estates around Berlin into an expanded city. The act increased the area of Berlin from 66 to 883 km2 (25 to 341 sq mi). The population almost doubled and Berlin had a population of around four million. During the Weimar era, Berlin underwent political unrest due to economic uncertainties, but also became a renowned center of the Roaring Twenties. The metropolis experienced its heyday as a major world capital and was known for its leadership roles in science, the humanities, city planning, film, higher education, government, and industries. Albert Einstein rose to public prominence during his years in Berlin, being awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1921.

Berlin in ruins after World War II (Potsdamer Platz, 1945).
In 1933, Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party came to power. NSDAP rule effectively destroyed Berlin’s Jewish community, which had numbered 160,000, representing one-third of all Jews in the country. Berlin’s Jewish population fell to about 80,000 as a result of emigration between 1933 and 1939. After Kristallnacht in 1938, thousands of the city’s persecuted groups were imprisoned in the nearby Sachsenhausen concentration camp or, starting in early 1943, were shipped to death camps, such as Auschwitz.[39] During World War II, large parts of Berlin were destroyed in the 1943–45 air raids and during the Battle of Berlin. Around 125,000 civilians were killed.[40] After the end of the war in Europe in 1945, Berlin received large numbers of refugees from the Eastern provinces. The victorious powers divided the city into four sectors, analogous to the occupation zones into which Germany was divided. The sectors of the Western Allies (the United States, the United Kingdom and France) formed West Berlin, while the Soviet sector formed East Berlin.[41]

The Berlin Wall in 1986, painted on the western side. People crossing the so-called "death strip" on the eastern side were at risk of being shot.
All four Allies shared administrative responsibilities for Berlin. However, in 1948, when the Western Allies extended the currency reform in the Western zones of Germany to the three western sectors of Berlin, the Soviet Union imposed a blockade on the access routes to and from West Berlin, which lay entirely inside Soviet-controlled territory. The Berlin airlift, conducted by the three western Allies, overcame this blockade by supplying food and other supplies to the city from June 1948 to May 1949.[42] In 1949, the Federal Republic of Germany was founded in West Germany and eventually included all of the American, British, and French zones, excluding those three countries’ zones in Berlin, while the Marxist-Leninist German Democratic Republic was proclaimed in East Germany. West Berlin officially remained an occupied city, but it politically was aligned with the Federal Republic of Germany despite West Berlin’s geographic isolation. Airline service to West Berlin was granted only to American, British, and French airlines.

The fall of the Berlin Wall on 9 November 1989. On 3 October 1990, the German reunification process was formally finished.
The founding of the two German states increased Cold War tensions. West Berlin was surrounded by East German territory, and East Germany proclaimed the Eastern part as its capital, a move that was not recognized by the western powers. East Berlin included most of the historic center of the city. The West German government established itself in Bonn.[43] In 1961, East Germany began the building of the Berlin Wall between East and West Berlin, and events escalated to a tank standoff at Checkpoint Charlie. West Berlin was now de facto a part of West Germany with a unique legal status, while East Berlin was de facto a part of East Germany. John F. Kennedy gave his "Ich bin ein Berliner" – speech in 1963 underlining the US support for the Western part of the city. Berlin was completely divided. Although it was possible for Westerners to pass from one to the other side through strictly controlled checkpoints, for most Easterners travel to West Berlin or West Germany prohibited. In 1971, a Four-Power agreement guaranteed access to and from West Berlin by car or train through East Germany.[44]

In 1989, with the end of the Cold War and pressure from the East German population, the Berlin Wall fell on 9 November and was subsequently mostly demolished. Today, the East Side Gallery preserves a large portion of the Wall. On 3 October 1990, the two parts of Germany were reunified as the Federal Republic of Germany, and Berlin again became the official German capital. In 1991, the German Parliament, the Bundestag, voted to move the seat of the (West) German capital from Bonn to Berlin, which was completed in 1999. Berlin’s 2001 administrative reform merged several districts. The number of boroughs was reduced from 23 to twelve. In 2006 the FIFA World Cup Final was held in Berlin.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin

Jewish Museum, Berlin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

The Libeskind-designed Jewish Museum Berlin, to the left of the old Kollegienhaus (before 2005).

Outside of the Jewish Museum view
The Jewish Museum Berlin (Jüdisches Museum Berlin) is one of the largest Jewish Museums in Europe. In three buildings, two of which are new additions specifically built for the museum by architect Daniel Libeskind, two millennia of German-Jewish history are on display in the permanent exhibition as well as in various changing exhibitions. German-Jewish history is documented in the collections, the library and the archive, in the computer terminals at the museum’s Rafael Roth Learning Center, and is reflected in the museum’s program of events. The museum was opened in 2001 and is one of Berlin’s most frequented museums (almost 720,000 visitors in 2012).[1]

Opposite the building ensemble, the Academy of the Jewish Museum Berlin was built – also after a design by Libeskind – in 2011/2012 in the former flower market hall. The archives, library, museum education department, and a lecture hall can all be found in the academy.[2]

Princeton economist W. Michael Blumenthal, who was born in Oranienburg near Berlin and was later President Jimmy Carter’s Secretary of the Treasury, has been the director of the museum since December 1997.[3]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_Museum,_Berlin

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Mille Miglia 2014

Some cool bernard turner images:

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Image by jaguarmena
Jaguar at Mille Miglia 2014, Italy

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bernard turner
Image by UIC Digital Collections
Title: 1939 graduating class, University of Illinois College of Medicine

Photographer: Daguerre Studio, 218 S. Wabash ave. Chicago
Description: 1939 graduating class, University of Illinois College of Medicine University of Illinois College of Medicine Class 1939 as pictured, left to right, top to bottom * indicates photographed graduate not listed in July 21, 1939 Board of Trustees report †indicates faculty/staff Joseph Harry Buckley Theodore Wallingford Brown Michael Joseph Campbell Thomas Stewart Cumming Harold Martin Engle Emil Stephan Danishek Homer Fauquier Weir Robert Archie Beebe Cornell Leonard Derengoski David Thomas Curtis Robert Dixon Roane Eugene Spierer Melville Daniel Hartman William Porter Swisher James Cone Fash Charles Rudolph Kudolla Louis Ehrlich Donald William Anderson Jack Walter Dworin Lawrence Edmund Foster Harold Todd Klein H. P. Carstens * (Herman Paul Carstens in Announcement for 1941-42) Frederick Howard Falls MS MD †Julius Hayes Hess MD †David John Davis PhD MD, Dean †Arthur Cutts Willard BS DEng LLD, President †George Robert Moon AM, Recorder †Francis Eugene Senear BS MD †Francis Loeffler Lederer BS MD †Raymond Hofstra Sheldon Edward Domm Norman James Ehrlich Jack M. Hellman Eric Oldberg PhD MD †Harold Douglas Singer MD †Robert Wood Keeton MS MD †Adolph Hartung MD †Lloyd Arnold AM MD †Samuel Azor Levinson MS MD †Hallard Beard BS MD †Jack James Bocian George Joseph Brebis Albert Sumner James Donald Pierce Henry Bascom Thomas BS MD †William Henry Welker AC PhD †Hugh Alister McGuigan MD PhD †Paul Louis Schroeder BS MD †Warren Henry Cole BS MD †Otto Frederick Kampmeier PhD MD †George Boris Hassin MD †George E. Wakerlin PhD MD †Stanley Edward Anderson Coye Carlton Mason Philip Lerner George Harley Moseley III Maynard Irwin Shapiro Delbert Wesley McKinney Stephen Matthew Chasten, Secretary Kieffer Evans Frantz, President Raymond Francis Corpe, Vice President Florence Eunice Hart Milo Hill Schosser Philip Thomas Weisbach Jr. Lawrence Stanley Mann Julius Benjamin Richmond John Anthony Mirro Arthur Israel Janus Howard Russell Hone Harold Anthony Grimm Leon Philip Gardner G. William Arends Dorothy Jean Niederman Samuel Sebastian Lombardo Carl Robert Newman Irving Herman Zitman LeRoy Eugene Walter Albert Joseph Simon Robert Rice Snively Francis Joseph Sazama William Elon Rapp F. S. Barringer * (Floyd Samuel Barringer in Announcement for 1941-42, Degree of Doctor of Medicine) Robert Rudolph Herbst Isadore Lerner D. R. Gossom * (Donn Roberts Gossom in Announcement for 1941-42, Degree of Doctor of Medicine) Edward Steven Lundgren Edward Bernard Plattner Frank Kondziorski Raymond Leo Tepper Ralph Strong Turner Roger Alan Van Atta P. L. Lane * (Paul Lilja Lane in Announcement for 1942-43, Degree of Doctor of Medicine) Gordon Laraway Richards Adolph Bartoli Jr. Leonard Albert Becker Louis B. Schwartz Jerome Casimir Prusinski Morris Lang Soddie James Barkett Boris Sergei Ury Sidney Klein Adrian Leonard Schreiber George Edward Twente Herman C. Sprecher Howard Arthur Lowy Melvin Simonson Not pictured: Morris Aran Adland Paul Binder Emmert George Boeke (Emmert G. Boeke in 1939 Illio, Alpha Kappa Kappa) George Borshevsky William John Brown Alexander Maurice Buchholz George Joseph Cooper Melvin Hugh Crocker (Melvin H. Crocker in 1938 Illio, Phi Chi) Albert Harold Diamondstone Ralph Marvin Dorne Maurice Joseph Drell Robert Birger Engstrom Peter Thomas Esposito Edith Farr Harold Xen Gerber Norman Byron Geyer (Norman B. Geyer in 1938 Illio, Phi Chi) Hyman Harry Gordon John Theodore Gregorio (John T. Gregorio in 1938 Illio, Phi Chi) Edward Stanley Grossman William Louis Grossman Norton Robert Groth Thrift Gene Hanks (Thrift G. Hanks in 1939 Illio, Phi Beta Pi) Fred Albert Heimstra (Fred A. Heimstra in 1938 Illio, Phi Chi) Andrew Jerome Hurter (Jerome A. Hurter in 1939 Illio, Alpha Kappa Kappa) Rex Leroy Iler John Baptist Ioriatti Harold Herman Joffe (a Herman Joffe is pictured in the 1938 composite) Aldona Ann Juska Benjamin Barnett Kaplan Delbert Cleo Kelly Herman George Klamka Louis Klein Sidney Kligerman Sydney Maurice Kolodny Paul Kotin Edward Wickliffe Kunckel (Edward W. Kunckel in 1939 Illio, Alpha Kappa Kappa) Joseph Francis Kuzma Lawrence Arnold Levitin Robert Lippert Jack William Millis Chauncey Lee Morton Benjamin Francis Novack Adrian Robert Oleck (Adrian R. Oleck in 1939 Illio, Phi Beta Pi) Seymour Leon Osher Amiel Lewis Palermo David Morton Porte Anita Esther Rapoport Irvin Maynard Reingold David Rest Albert R. Rosanova Leo Leiff Roseman William Elles Russell (William E. Russell in 1939 Illio, Phi Beta Pi) Arthur Keller Salberg William Rhinehart Schick Isadore Joseph Schiff Manuel Schreiber Edward Emil Schumacher (Edward E. Schumacher in 1939 Illio, Alpha Kappa Kappa) Morey Max Segal William Thurman Shaffer Jr. (William T. Shaffer in 1939 Illio, Alpha Kappa Kappa) Thomas Victor Shiels Benjamin Franklin Shirer Bernard Strassman Evert Anders Swensson (Everet A. Swensson in 1938 Illio, Phi Chi) Edward Francis Webb Henry Sol Weiskopf Alvin Weiss Irving Weissman Carl Elmer Westmark Evelyn Martha Witthoff Laddie Walter Zeman (Laddie W. Zeman in 1939 Illio, Phi Rho Sigma) William Joseph Zimring

Date: 1939

Collection: University of Illinois College of Medicine Graduating Class Composite Photos
Repository: Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library
Credit Line: Cite as 1939 graduating class, University of Illinois College of Medicine; University of Illinois College of Medicine Graduating Class Composite Photos; University of Illinois at Chicago Library
Rights: This image may be used freely, with attribution, for research, study and educational purposes. For permission to publish, distribute, or use this image for any other purpose, please contact Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library at digitizeuic@yahoo.com
File Name: UA016.36.01.01_0001_1939.1

For more images from the collection, visit collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_uic_cmc.php?CIS…

http://glasgowpdc.co.uk/?rafinad=%D9%85%D8%A4%D8%B4%D8%B1%D8%A7%D8%AA-%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%81%D9%88%D8%B1%D9%83%D8%B3&1a3=14 مؤشرات الفوركس 1903 graduating class, University of Illinois College of Medicine
bernard turner
Image by UIC Digital Collections
1903 graduating class, University of Illinois College of Medicine
Photograph credited to Wm. L. Koehne, Photo. Bush Temple, Chicago

as pictured, left to right, top to bottom
* indicates photographed graduate not listed in 1921 alumni record
† indicates faculty/staff
‡ indicates photo missing from composite

Harry Leonard Jacobs
Henry Thomas Wichman
T. L. Wagner *
Adolph Thomas Gilhus MD
Newton Whitney Wear
L. Faulkner MD * (There is a Louis Faulkner listed in the class of 1904)
Varillas Clenthas Birney Jr.
Hicks Lowis Adams PhG
Charles William Cleveland BS
Adam Szwajkart PhG MD
Charles Lafayette Williams
Anton Byron Jensen
Henry William Lang
G. W. Bamberger * (There is a George Washington Bamberger listed in the class of 1904)
Louis Walter Fee BS
Frank H. Clark MD
Emil Otto Ficke
Maurice Altman
Anna Martha Haeusler
William Christian Wagner
Harriet Belle Jennings (Wagner)
Elwood Almon Kingston AB

H. E. Nelson * (There is a Henry Eugene Nelson listed in the class of 1904)
Henry Payne Clarke
Edward William Gage
William Patrick Forkin
Albert Theodore Kaupp MD
Ludwig F. Hooge
Metta Viola Jones Collins
Charles Lloyd Egbert
William Aaron Pitzele
Edward John Fucik
Clarence Lloyd McNett
Josephine Ella Webster (Weld)
James C. Weld
George Albert Gardner
Gertrude Anna Spriggs MD
John William Powers
Eli Rich Crew
Norman Edgar Anderson
Edward Franklin Leonard MD
Rosa Vorsanger
Lloyd Bartmess Foster
Joseph William Helz
Clara Fogle (Palmer)
Henry Milton Penrice

Blanche Edith Webber
O. C. Amundson * (there is an Orrin C. Amundson listed in the class of 1904)
Nels Lawrencer Werner
Blance Elizabeth Converse Hopkins AB
Roy Philson Stoops
Ernest Albert Jenkinson
Sylvan Gabriel Cohen
John Poler Walsh MD
Giovanni Alfonso Barricelli AB
Gertrude Francis Thompson
Franklin Pierce Beck
Ezra Edward Geisel
Henry Burton Roberts MD
Frank Waldemar Pope
Michael Ambrose Desmond
William Brigham Parkinson Jr.
Jacob Jesse Hood MD
Meda Hess
William Ernest Long
Mayer Harris Lebensohn
Charles Oliver Burgess
Irving Angel Porges

Julian J. Golembiowski
William Ross Claybaugh PhG
Charles Walter Winne PhC
Laura Sommer Tomhagan
Milton Dana Jewell BS
James Garfield Lamb
Paul Robert Urmston
Julius C. Osher DDS
Neil Munn McNeill
Edward Patera PhG
Harry Thomson Cummings
Charles Norman Bottum BS

Matthew Simpson Reay
Helen Louise Ryerson
Frank S. Tufts DVS MS
James Manley Wood AB
Lewis Edgar Klinefelter
Julius A. Johnson
Zaroohie Serope Kavaljian
Jesse Drew Carpenter
Emanuel Ferdinand Napieralski
Elgin Leroy Stoughton

Harry Thomas Kenney
Edith Stockton Birney MD
E. P. Ullman *
Nelson John Robbins
George Merrill Hawkins
Francis Roberta Sherwood MD †
Alexander Hugh Ferguson MD †
Albert John Ochsner MD †
John Alphonso Wesener PhC MD †
Frank Breckinridge Earle MD †
William Edward Quine, MD †
Andrew Sloan Draper LLD †
Oscar A. King MD †
Daniel Atkinson King Steele MD †
Edward Franklin Wells MD †
George Frank Butler PhG MD †
William McIntyre Harsha AB MD †
William Thomas Eckley MD †
Frank Joseph Pokorney PhG
J. J. Monahan AB * (there is a James John Monahan listed in the class of 1904)
Ernest Gray Reese PhC
Ransom Logan Estes
Olie Ellend Hagen

Bernard Montrose Conley
A. J. Stuenkel * (there is an Arthur John Stuenkel listed in the class of 1904)
Esther Annie Ryerson
William Edward Hart
Robert Griffin Dakin
Carl Beck MD †
Henry Parker Newman AM MD †
Fred Carl Zapffe MD †
Sanger Brown MD †
William Augustus Evans BS MD †
Andrew McDermid MD †
Robert Hall Babcock AM MD †
Bayard Holmes BS MD †
Casey Albert Wood CM MD †
Thomas Archibald Davis, MD †
Charles Spencer Williamson BS MD †
Norman Lee Seelye
Henry Augustine Hewins
Helen Bozena Molnar-Sasko
Edwin Burchett
David Ralph Landau PhG

William M. Rightman
Francoise John Theodore Was
Matthew William Dvorak
Lamar Matthew Power
Harry Charles McCarthy
Harris Ellett Santee AM MD †
Channing Whitney Barrett MD †
Joseph McIntyre Patton MD †
Moreau Roberts Brown MD †
Stephen Gano West MD †
G. Frank Lydston MD †
Adolph Gehrmann MD †
Walter Shield Christopher, MD †
William Allen Pusey AM MD †
Arthur Henry Brumback MD †
John Erasmus Harper AM MD †
L. Blake Baldwin MD †
Frank Eldridge Wynekoop MS MD †
Harry Floyde Vaughan
Frank Marion Barker AM
Robert Von Der Heydt
William Chambers Phillips PhG
C. H. Pickett Jr. * (there is a Charles Henry Pickett listed in the class of 1904)

Lloyd Melville Sackett
Irving Herbert Eddy
Nellie Bernice Johnson
Ellis Frank Swarthout
Lucius Boardman Donkle
Daniel Nathan Eisendrath AB MD †
George Peter Dreyer PhD †
Louis Githens Witherspoon BS MD †
Chas. Clayton O’Byrne MD †
Edwin Graffam Earle MD †
Lee Harrison Mettler MD †
Twing Brooks Wiggin MD †
Henry Turman Byford AM MD †
Don Lee Shaw MD †
John Fisher MD †
Henry Leland Tolman †
John Lincoln Porter MD †
Charles Wallace Poorman
Julia Clark Strawn MD
Edward Marcellus Holmes
Charles Edwin Barnes
Mary Ella Ash BS

James William Wilson
William Arthur Shepherd
Joseph Alfred Uran
Julius Hilton Sure
Frederick Lantz Gourley
Josephus Johnston Sherrill
Walter F. Wessels
Richard Leonard Eldredge
Will H. Moore
Phillip Henry Holmes
Michael Edward McGann
Frank Crist Fisher
Louis Henry Frechtling
Bernard Sylvester Maloy
Charles McRae Morgan AB
Henry McMunn Voris
Frederick Almon Thayer
Niels Nicolai John Nielsen
Burton Wilson Mack

R. L. Groff *
James Aurelius Young
Margaret May Jones (Monohan) BS
Ernest Sisson Moore PhB
Lyston Drewette Howe Jr.
Herbert Clark Waddle
George Herbert Howard
David Chillingworth Dodds BS
William Truman Barnum
Daniel Greenwood Tweedall
George Franklin Blough
William H. Porter
Emil Bernard Anderson
Robert Crump King
Benjamin Thomas
Carleton Spencer Myers
Milton Weston Hall BS
Marion Michael Null BS
Wenzel M. Wochos
Charlton Edward Hagyard
Joseph Michael Hilger
D. L. Parker * (there is a Don Louis Parker listed in the class of 1904)
Frank Perrine Whitehill LLB

Edward James Oberholtzer PhG
Mary Brooks Baird AB
Charles Elias McCarty
Verne Ernest Winston
John Harvey Copenhaver
Archie Solomon Horn
Leroy Hall Sibley
Bernard Gerson Katz
Lamont Roy Willson
Edwin Jay Butterfield
M. M. Loomis Lib. †
William Henry Browne Supt. †
Elizabeth M. Heelan Clk. †
John Eddy Haskell AB
William Francis Casavaw
Matilda Minnis Thomas
Seth Wicks
Harvey Marshall Vance
Lyford McChesney Johnson
Arthur Valentine deNeveu
Harry Enoch Goldberger PhG
Samuel Milligan Anderson PhB
Emilian Otto Houda
Emma Eliza Robbins
J. L. Smith (there is a James Lawrence Smith listed in the class of 1904)
Clarence Hayes Doty
Walter Wood Greaves
Oscar Gustav Fischer
Clark Edward Saunders
Charles Sylvester Mellen
Charles Eaton Phillips AB
Emory West Reeves
Nancy Lee Martin Bechtol
Thomas Albert Bryan
Harvey James Forbes
William Dunn Madden
Guy Clifford Waufle
Charles Wallace Ransom ‡
Edward Worthington Jackson
Clara Dunn
Martin Thaddeus Joyce
T. Z. Xelowski
Albert Christian William Seidel
Fred A. Fanyo
Jacob Lester Barnsback
Thomas Ambrose Buchanan
John J. Nowakowski
Louis Henry Geiger

Not pictured:
Viola Bandy Beck
Orville Everett Beebe (O. E. Beebe pictured in 1902 composite)
Alice Barlow Brown
Aria Louis Derdiger
Frederick Rhinhard Dorn
Calvin Willoughby Harrison
Ernest Albert Jenkinson
Ralph Emmette Jennings (R. E. Jennings pictured in 1902 composite)
John Herbert Kincaid (J. H. Kincaid pictured in 1902 composite)
Maximilian Kuznik
Eva Prescott (Turner)
Charles Watson Snyder

University of Illinois College of Medicine Graduating Class Composite Photos. Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library

This image may be used freely, with attribution, for research, study and educational purposes. For permission to publish, distribute, or use this image for any other purpose, please contact Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library at digitizeuic@yahoo.com

Cite as 1903 graduating class, University of Illinois College of Medicine; University of Illinois College of Medicine Graduating Class Composite Photos; University of Illinois at Chicago Library

For more images from the collection, visit collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_uic_cmc.php?CIS…

2014 FIFA World Champion!!!!! Deutsche Lufthansa Boeing 747-830 D-ABYI “Siegerflieger” “Fanhansa” “Potsdam” 15.07.2014 Frankfurt Airport

A few nice FIFA 15 images I found:

forex öppettider i norrköping 2014 FIFA World Champion!!!!! Deutsche Lufthansa Boeing 747-830 D-ABYI “Siegerflieger” “Fanhansa” “Potsdam” 15.07.2014 Frankfurt Airport
FIFA 15
Image by Kiefer.

forex sälja mynt 2014 FIFA World Champion!!!!! Deutsche Lufthansa Boeing 747-830 D-ABYI “Siegerflieger” “Fanhansa” “Potsdam” 15.07.2014 Frankfurt Airport
FIFA 15
Image by Kiefer.

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FIFA 15
Image by Stuck in Customs
Chaos in the streets all night!

(and yes, it’s worth a zoom)

All Rights Reserved – Trey Ratcliff – From Stuck In Customs www.stuckincustoms.com

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