Tag Archives: nice

Nice Authority photos

A few nice authority images I found:

lön på forex God’s Authority
authority
Image by Seth Drum
www.holyspiritspeaks.org/god-himself-the-unique-i/

God Himself, the Unique I

God’s Authority (I)

Now let us begin to read the following scriptures from the Bible.

1." God Uses Words to Create All Things

1) (Gen 1:3-5) And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day."

bitcoin trading Port Authority
authority
Image by kokeshi

Nice Lionel Messi photos

A few nice Lionel Messi images I found:

منتدى الاسهم السعوديه Lionel Messi festeja
Lionel Messi
Image by prismatico
ROME – MAY 27: Lionel Messi of Barcelona celebrates scoring the second goal for Barcelona during the UEFA Champions League Final match between Barcelona and Manchester United at the Stadio Olimpico on May 27, 2009 in Rome, Italy. (Photo by Jasper Juinen/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Lionel Messi

jobba hemifrån anställd Lionel Messi 11
Lionel Messi
Image by Themeplus

jobba hemifrån yrken El Neoplan Starliner de Lionel Messi
Lionel Messi
Image by Galeria de Fan Bus, difusión y prensa
Un amplia nevera

Foto:© Press-inform – Das Pressebuero Alemania

Nice No Man’s Sky photos

Some cool No Man’s Sky images:

http://justicesunday.com/blog/wp-admin/ hotforex server Renato Muccillo – “Vallery Thunderhead” (2013)
No Man's Sky
Image by Mia Feigelson Gallery
"Valley Thunderhead" (2013)
By Renato Muccillo, from Canada
– oil on canvas; 48 x 48 in –
renatomuccillo.com/home.html
www.facebook.com/pages/Renato-Muccillo-Fine-Arts-Studio/1…
Renato Muccillo’s landscapes have often been compared to those of Dutch masters and 19th Century English artists. However, Muccillo’s images remind us how frequently today’s landscape has been affected and appropriated by man and industry. We are mesmerized at first by the luxurious colours and near miraculous use of light but, on closer inspection, we notice the culvert, the pilings, the log booms, or the distant plume of smoke stacks. Even the farms that serve as subject matters of his paintings leave us wondering if they are viable or abandoned as there is no sign of human life—only the marks left behind by man and machine. It is a curious relationship between the sheer beauty and effect of light as it hits, or emanates from, intrusive steam plumes. The radiance is gorgeous, the content disquieting. And yet we have grown so accustomed to these elements in our surroundings that we frequently overlook them, taking for granted what is actually there. Muccillo plays on that subtle distraction and steers our eye toward man’s impact on nature by compelling us to recognize, if not falsely sense, nature’s overwhelming beauty. To look upon one of his paintings is, at times, akin to being lured by the siren song of modernity in the context of wished-for romanticism. In the end, we are often inexplicably compelled to look upward to the sky and fix our eyes there, forgetting what we have left, or been left with, below. Perhaps it is for that reason Muccillo’s skies are what we remember most of his landscapes, long after we have walked away from them.
On the opposite end of the spectrum are Muccillo’s expressionist florals and abstracts. They are a shout of release, a slap in the eye needed to wake us from our soporific diversions while celebrating colour for the sake of colour alone. Their joyousness offer a sense of relief, and even rejoicing, in the storm of his landscapes and incredible versatility.

توصيات الاسهم السبت رمضان 1433 Renato Mucillo – “Southern Front” (2013) [Sold]
No Man's Sky
Image by Mia Feigelson Gallery
"Southern Front" (2013)
By Renato Muccillo, from Canada
– oil on canvas; 18 x 18 in –
renatomuccillo.com/home.html
www.facebook.com/pages/Renato-Muccillo-Fine-Arts-Studio/1…
Renato Muccillo’s landscapes have often been compared to those of Dutch masters and 19th Century English artists. However, Muccillo’s images remind us how frequently today’s landscape has been affected and appropriated by man and industry. We are mesmerized at first by the luxurious colours and near miraculous use of light but, on closer inspection, we notice the culvert, the pilings, the log booms, or the distant plume of smoke stacks. Even the farms that serve as subject matters of his paintings leave us wondering if they are viable or abandoned as there is no sign of human life—only the marks left behind by man and machine.
It is a curious relationship between the sheer beauty and effect of light as it hits, or emanates from, intrusive steam plumes. The radiance is gorgeous, the content disquieting. And yet we have grown so accustomed to these elements in our surroundings that we frequently overlook them, taking for granted what is actually there. Muccillo plays on that subtle distraction and steers our eye toward man’s impact on nature by compelling us to recognize, if not falsely sense, nature’s overwhelming beauty. To look upon one of his paintings is, at times, akin to being lured by the siren song of modernity in the context of wished-for romanticism. In the end, we are often inexplicably compelled to look upward to the sky and fix our eyes there, forgetting what we have left, or been left with, below. Perhaps it is for that reason Muccillo’s skies are what we remember most of his landscapes, long after we have walked away from them.

On the opposite end of the spectrum are Muccillo’s expressionist florals and abstracts. They are a shout of release, a slap in the eye needed to wake us from our soporific diversions while celebrating colour for the sake of colour alone. Their joyousness offer a sense of relief, and even rejoicing, in the storm of his landscapes and incredible versatility.

Nice Christian photos

Some cool christian images:

تعليم كيفية تداول في سوق الذهب christian
christian
Image by kynan tait
christian whiticar. aka christ-chin, whiteacres, whittiker, hansel. what a rare sighting! christian is usually locked up playing half life. LAN PARTY!

غرفة مملكة تداول الاسهم السعوديه Christian
christian
Image by slgckgc

Nice Johnny Depp photos

Check out these Johnny Depp images:

http://francesdowell.com/?p=1754 تداول السوق Johnny
Johnny Depp
Image by Thomas Hawk

مواعيد العمل في سوق الاسهم السعودي Depp
Johnny Depp
Image by Thomas Hawk

طريقة بيع وشراء الاسهم JOHNNY DEPP
Johnny Depp
Image by Sharon Graphics
Johnny Depp waiting to speak at Penelope Cruise’s STAR ceremonyy

Nice Ina Garten photos

A few nice Ina Garten images I found:

http://greatest-trends.com/?komynalkaarabov=%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A3%D8%B3%D9%87%D9%85-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B3%D8%B9%D9%88%D8%AF%D9%8A%D8%A9-%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%8A%D9%88%D9%85-%D9%85%D8%A8%D8%A7%D8%B4%D8%B1&411=be الأسهم السعودية اليوم مباشر Image from page 116 of “State Female Normal School (Farmville, Va.) Undergraduate Catalog” (1905)
Ina Garten
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: statefemalenorm190506stat
Title: State Female Normal School (Farmville, Va.) Undergraduate Catalog
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors: State Female Normal School (Farmville, Va.)
Subjects: State Female Normal School (Farmville, Va.) – Curricula – Catalogs State Teachers College (Farmville, Va.) – Curricula – Catalogs Longwood College – Curricula – Catalogs Longwood University – Curricula – Catalogs
Publisher: State Female Normal School, Farmville, Va.
Contributing Library: Longwood University
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
l topics completed, I. Exercises with objects. 1. Counting objects in the school room, as chairs, desks, etc.,afterwards objects to be counted limited to kindergarten sticksor splints. 2. Recognizing numbers in groups, using cards with dots ina group. 3. Separating numbers into two groups, using cards withdots in two groups. 4. Measuring lengths, using inch, foot-rules and yard-stick. 5. Cultivating ability to judge capacity, using actual meas-ures, the pint, quart, gallon and half gallon. 6. Teaching money value, using real coin or toy money, play-ing at buying and selling. 7. Teaching meaning of terms, one-half, one-third and one-fourth. 8. Counting by twos, threes, fours and fives, using kinder-garten splints or numeral frame. 9. Counting by tens to a hundred, by tens to a thousand, andusing kindergarten sticks and rubber bands for bundling intotens. II. Exercises with Symbols. 1. Making and reading figures 1 to 100. Place valuetaught and emphasized by use of splint and splint box.

Text Appearing After Image:
State Female Normal School 89 2, The 36 facts of addition so taught as to give inversely thefacts in subtraction and comparison. The meaning and use ofthe signs plus and minus (-|- and —) taught by use in simpleproblems, which problems must appeal to the home life and im-mediate needs of the children. Second Grade Counting. Counting by 2s, 3s, 4s and 5s to 10 times eachnumber as a basis for the multiplication table which is taughtthrough 10×5. Denominate Numbers. Review work of the first grade; addtable of weight: ounce, pound; dry measure: quart, peck, bushel;time: reading time by the clock, current dates. Addition, Comparison, Subtraction. Problems in all threeprocesses given after thorough review of the 36 facts of addition. Division. Division only within the range of the multiplica-tion table taught. Symbols. The reading and writing of figures to 10,000.Terms plus and minus taught. Problems. In general these shall involve but one operation. Third Grade Work of previous grades re

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

بنك الامارات دبي الوطني الاسهم Lemons
Ina Garten
Image by edwardkimuk

http://zso.sokolka.pl/?polca=gra-na-gie%C5%82dzie-przez-internet gra na giełdzie przez internet Me with Ina Garten
Ina Garten
Image by cjaffepickett
I was thrilled to meet the Barefoot Contessa, particularly since her show on the Food Network is very easy to follow and she has a home in one of my favorite parts of the country, eastern Long Island. It was interesting to learn more about her life on a recent edition of "Chefography." She used to work on energy policy at the White House!

Nice FIFA 15 photos

Check out these FIFA 15 images:

15.06 | França x Honduras
FIFA 15
Image by refetzner
Uma das cidades-sede da Copa do Mundo, Porto Alegre teve sua rotina alterada por torcedores de diferentes países.

@ World Cup 2014

Summer holiday 2014
FIFA 15
Image by F.d.W.
Summer holiday 2014
In and around Berlin Germany

Berlin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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This article is about the capital of Germany. For other uses, see Berlin (disambiguation).

Berlin

State of Germany
Clockwise: Charlottenburg Palace, Fernsehturm Berlin, Reichstag building, Berlin Cathedral, Alte Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Platz and Brandenburg Gate.
Clockwise: Charlottenburg Palace, Fernsehturm Berlin, Reichstag building, Berlin Cathedral, Alte Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Platz and Brandenburg Gate.

Flag of Berlin
Flag Coat of arms of Berlin
Coat of arms

Location within European Union and Germany
Location within European Union and Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°23′ECoordinates: 52°31′N 13°23′E

Country
Germany

Government

• Governing Mayor
Michael Müller (SPD)

• Governing parties
SPD / CDU

• Votes in Bundesrat
4 (of 69)

Area

• City
891.85 km2 (344.35 sq mi)

Elevation
34 m (112 ft)

Population (December 2013)[1]

• City
3,517,424

• Density
3,900/km2 (10,000/sq mi)

Demonym
Berliner

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

• Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

Postal code(s)
10115–14199

Area code(s)
030

ISO 3166 code
DE-BE

Vehicle registration
B[2]

GDP/ Nominal
€109.2 billion (2013) [3]

NUTS Region
DE3

Website
berlin.de

Berlin (/bərˈlɪn/; German pronunciation: [bɛɐ̯ˈliːn] ( listen)) is the capital of Germany and one of the 16 states of Germany. With a population of 3.5 million people,[4] Berlin is Germany’s largest city. It is the second most populous city proper and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union.[5] Located in northeastern Germany on the River Spree, it is the center of the Berlin-Brandenburg Metropolitan Region, which has about 4.5 million residents from over 180 nations.[6][7][8][9] Due to its location in the European Plain, Berlin is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. Around one third of the city’s area is composed of forests, parks, gardens, rivers and lakes.[10]

First documented in the 13th century, Berlin became the capital of the Margraviate of Brandenburg (1417), the Kingdom of Prussia (1701–1918), the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1919–1933) and the Third Reich (1933–1945).[11] Berlin in the 1920s was the third largest municipality in the world.[12] After World War II, the city was divided; East Berlin became the capital of East Germany while West Berlin became a de facto West German exclave, surrounded by the Berlin Wall (1961–1989).[13] Following German reunification in 1990, the city was once more designated as the capital of all Germany, hosting 158 foreign embassies.[14]

Berlin is a world city of culture, politics, media, and science.[15][16][17][18] Its economy is based on high-tech firms and the service sector, encompassing a diverse range of creative industries, research facilities, media corporations, and convention venues.[19][20] Berlin serves as a continental hub for air and rail traffic and has a highly complex public transportation network. The metropolis is a popular tourist destination.[21] Significant industries also include IT, pharmaceuticals, biomedical engineering, clean tech, biotechnology, construction, and electronics.

Modern Berlin is home to renowned universities, orchestras, museums, entertainment venues, and is host to many sporting events.[22] Its urban setting has made it a sought-after location for international film productions.[23] The city is well known for its festivals, diverse architecture, nightlife, contemporary arts, and a high quality of living.[24] Over the last decade Berlin has seen the upcoming of a cosmopolitan entrepreneurial scene.[25]

20th to 21st centuries[edit]

Street, Berlin (1913) by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
After 1910 Berlin had become a fertile ground for the German Expressionist movement. In fields such as architecture, painting and cinema new forms of artistic styles were invented. At the end of World War I in 1918, a republic was proclaimed by Philipp Scheidemann at the Reichstag building. In 1920, the Greater Berlin Act incorporated dozens of suburban cities, villages, and estates around Berlin into an expanded city. The act increased the area of Berlin from 66 to 883 km2 (25 to 341 sq mi). The population almost doubled and Berlin had a population of around four million. During the Weimar era, Berlin underwent political unrest due to economic uncertainties, but also became a renowned center of the Roaring Twenties. The metropolis experienced its heyday as a major world capital and was known for its leadership roles in science, the humanities, city planning, film, higher education, government, and industries. Albert Einstein rose to public prominence during his years in Berlin, being awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1921.

Berlin in ruins after World War II (Potsdamer Platz, 1945).
In 1933, Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party came to power. NSDAP rule effectively destroyed Berlin’s Jewish community, which had numbered 160,000, representing one-third of all Jews in the country. Berlin’s Jewish population fell to about 80,000 as a result of emigration between 1933 and 1939. After Kristallnacht in 1938, thousands of the city’s persecuted groups were imprisoned in the nearby Sachsenhausen concentration camp or, starting in early 1943, were shipped to death camps, such as Auschwitz.[39] During World War II, large parts of Berlin were destroyed in the 1943–45 air raids and during the Battle of Berlin. Around 125,000 civilians were killed.[40] After the end of the war in Europe in 1945, Berlin received large numbers of refugees from the Eastern provinces. The victorious powers divided the city into four sectors, analogous to the occupation zones into which Germany was divided. The sectors of the Western Allies (the United States, the United Kingdom and France) formed West Berlin, while the Soviet sector formed East Berlin.[41]

The Berlin Wall in 1986, painted on the western side. People crossing the so-called "death strip" on the eastern side were at risk of being shot.
All four Allies shared administrative responsibilities for Berlin. However, in 1948, when the Western Allies extended the currency reform in the Western zones of Germany to the three western sectors of Berlin, the Soviet Union imposed a blockade on the access routes to and from West Berlin, which lay entirely inside Soviet-controlled territory. The Berlin airlift, conducted by the three western Allies, overcame this blockade by supplying food and other supplies to the city from June 1948 to May 1949.[42] In 1949, the Federal Republic of Germany was founded in West Germany and eventually included all of the American, British, and French zones, excluding those three countries’ zones in Berlin, while the Marxist-Leninist German Democratic Republic was proclaimed in East Germany. West Berlin officially remained an occupied city, but it politically was aligned with the Federal Republic of Germany despite West Berlin’s geographic isolation. Airline service to West Berlin was granted only to American, British, and French airlines.

The fall of the Berlin Wall on 9 November 1989. On 3 October 1990, the German reunification process was formally finished.
The founding of the two German states increased Cold War tensions. West Berlin was surrounded by East German territory, and East Germany proclaimed the Eastern part as its capital, a move that was not recognized by the western powers. East Berlin included most of the historic center of the city. The West German government established itself in Bonn.[43] In 1961, East Germany began the building of the Berlin Wall between East and West Berlin, and events escalated to a tank standoff at Checkpoint Charlie. West Berlin was now de facto a part of West Germany with a unique legal status, while East Berlin was de facto a part of East Germany. John F. Kennedy gave his "Ich bin ein Berliner" – speech in 1963 underlining the US support for the Western part of the city. Berlin was completely divided. Although it was possible for Westerners to pass from one to the other side through strictly controlled checkpoints, for most Easterners travel to West Berlin or West Germany prohibited. In 1971, a Four-Power agreement guaranteed access to and from West Berlin by car or train through East Germany.[44]

In 1989, with the end of the Cold War and pressure from the East German population, the Berlin Wall fell on 9 November and was subsequently mostly demolished. Today, the East Side Gallery preserves a large portion of the Wall. On 3 October 1990, the two parts of Germany were reunified as the Federal Republic of Germany, and Berlin again became the official German capital. In 1991, the German Parliament, the Bundestag, voted to move the seat of the (West) German capital from Bonn to Berlin, which was completed in 1999. Berlin’s 2001 administrative reform merged several districts. The number of boroughs was reduced from 23 to twelve. In 2006 the FIFA World Cup Final was held in Berlin.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin

Jewish Museum, Berlin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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The Libeskind-designed Jewish Museum Berlin, to the left of the old Kollegienhaus (before 2005).

Outside of the Jewish Museum view
The Jewish Museum Berlin (Jüdisches Museum Berlin) is one of the largest Jewish Museums in Europe. In three buildings, two of which are new additions specifically built for the museum by architect Daniel Libeskind, two millennia of German-Jewish history are on display in the permanent exhibition as well as in various changing exhibitions. German-Jewish history is documented in the collections, the library and the archive, in the computer terminals at the museum’s Rafael Roth Learning Center, and is reflected in the museum’s program of events. The museum was opened in 2001 and is one of Berlin’s most frequented museums (almost 720,000 visitors in 2012).[1]

Opposite the building ensemble, the Academy of the Jewish Museum Berlin was built – also after a design by Libeskind – in 2011/2012 in the former flower market hall. The archives, library, museum education department, and a lecture hall can all be found in the academy.[2]

Princeton economist W. Michael Blumenthal, who was born in Oranienburg near Berlin and was later President Jimmy Carter’s Secretary of the Treasury, has been the director of the museum since December 1997.[3]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_Museum,_Berlin