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Image from page 450 of “An art edition of Shakespeare, classified as comedies, tragedies, histories and sonnets, each part arranged in chronological order, including also a list of familiar quotations” (1889)

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Bonus Forex Image from page 450 of “An art edition of Shakespeare, classified as comedies, tragedies, histories and sonnets, each part arranged in chronological order, including also a list of familiar quotations” (1889)
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Identifier: arteditionofshak00shak
Title: An art edition of Shakespeare, classified as comedies, tragedies, histories and sonnets, each part arranged in chronological order, including also a list of familiar quotations
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 Lamb, Charles, 1775-1834 Lamb, Mary, 1764-1847 Seymour, Mary. [from old catalog] Gaskell, Charles Arthur, 1849- ed. [from old catalog] Gilbert, John, Sir, 1817-1897, illus
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Publisher: Chicago, U. S. publishing house
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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ervants to Brutus. A Soothsayer.SCENE—The Neighborhood of Sardis; the Neighborhood of Philippi. ACT L Sceke L Eome. A Street. Enter Flavius, Marullus, and certainCommoners.Flav. Hence! home, you idle creaturesget you home:Is this a lioliday? what! know you not,Being mechanical, you ought not walkUpon a laboring day without the signOf your profession? Speak, what tradeart thou?First Com. Why, sir, a carpenter.Mar. Where is thy leather apron andthy rule?What dost thou with thy best apparel on?You, sir, what trade are you? Sec. Com. Truly, sir, in respect of afine workman, I am but, as you would say.,a cobbler. Mar. But what trade art thou? answerme directly. Sec. Com. A trade, sir, that, I hope, Imay use with a safe conscience; which is,indeed, sir, a mender of bad soles. Mar. What trade, thou knave? thounaughty knave, what trade? Sec. Com. Nay, I beseech you, sir, benot out with me: yet, if you be out, sir, Tcan mend you. Mar. What meanest thou by that?mend me, thou saucy fellow! il2

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Act I. JULIUS C^SAR. Scene I. Sec. Com. Why, sir, cobble yon.Flav. Thou art a cobbler, art thou?Sec. Com. Truly, sir, all that I live byis with the awl: I meddle with no trades-mans matters, nor womens matters, butwith awl. I am, indeed, sir, a surgeon toold shoes; when they are in great danger,I recover them. As proper men as evertrod upon neats leather have gone uponmy handiwork. Flav. But wherefore art not in thyshop to-day?Why dost thou lead these men about thestreets?Sec. Com. Truly, sir, to wear out theirshoes, to get myself into more work. Bu t,indeed, sir, we make holiday, to see Cgesarand to rejoice in his triumph. Mar. Wherefore rejoice? What con-quest brings he home?What tributaries follow him to Eome,To grace in captive bonds his chariot-wheels?You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things!0 yoii hard hearts, you cruel men of Rome,Knew you not Pompey? Many a time and oftHave you climbed up to walls and battle-ments.To towers and windows, yea, to chimney-tops.Your

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Image from page 138 of “Halcyon” (1905)

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Identifier: halcyon1905unse
Title: Halcyon
Year: 1905 (1900s)
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Subjects: Swarthmore College — College Yearbooks
Publisher: Swarthmore, Pa.: Swarthmore College
Contributing Library: Swarthmore College Library
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de Halkett,Edna Hamilton,Emilie Hill, Elizabeth C. Allen,Julia Y. Atkinson,Flora M. Boyle,Ethel H. Brewster,Marion G. Comly,Mary W. Conrow,Mary B. Cranston,Jeanette Curtis,Hazel L. Davis, Mary Washburn.J907 Sarah Hunt,Jane Lippincott,Arvilla Lang,Alice Maris,Emily McKee,Bertha Peirce,Ruth Richards,Rachel Robinson,Grace Schwenk,Emily Schoenemann,Marie Sabsovich,Laura Strode,Caroline Underhill,Caroline Washburn, Alma E. Dickinson,Pauline M. Durnall,Katharine Procter Green,Jane R. Harper,Mary L. Hoopes,Louise W. Horner,Clementine G. Hulbert,Mary T. Janney,Elizabeth Johnson, 112 Maude Kem merer,Alice Keim, .LiLLiE H. Koenig,Ella C. Levis,Edith S. Lewis,Elizabeth R. Lippincott,Martha Lippincott,Ethel MacCarthy,Grace Mickle,Mary E. North,Emma Ogden,Margaret Pennock,Jean S. Peoples, Margaret M. Pomeroy,Helen Price,Helen R. Ridgeway,Mary S. Romer, LiLLIE RoSENBLUTH, Ethel P. B. Slack,Edith M. Spencer,Edna Stradling,Marietta Van De Verg,Mary Verlenden,Mabel Vernon,Emma J. Wilson,Laura A. Wood.

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3 lEunomlan Xitetar^ Society Motto:—Uiiitas, profectus, pcrfettiitas. ifirst ttermHalliday R. Jackson, 1904; William Diebold. igo6; Floyd H. Bradley, 1904; Maurice E. Griest, 1904; Brittain E. Lukens, 1904; Louis N. Robinson, 1905; J. Pierre Seaman, 1906; Frederic N. Price, 1905,Henry F. Price, 1905,Maurice T. Hansell, 1904,Frederic E. Griest, 1904, President: Vice-President: Recording Secretary: Corresponding Secretary: Treasurer: Censor:Librarian:Library Committee: Sccon» ttermMaurice E. Griest, 1904. Henry F. Price. 1905. Arthur W. Broomell. 1906. T. Carle Parry, Jr., 1907. William Diebold, igo6. Frederic N. Price, 1905. Maurice T. Hansell, 1904. Barclay White, Jr., 1906,Halliday R. Jackson. 1904.Geo. Lupton Broomell. 1906,George S. Roberts, 1906. 114

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Image taken from page 829 of ‘The Illustrated History of England … Comprising also a summary of the history of the nations of Europe … With … engravings … Edited by H. W. D’

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التداول forex Title: "The Illustrated History of England … Comprising also a summary of the history of the nations of Europe … With … engravings … Edited by H. W. D"
http://www.fiv5starhousecleaning.com/?rabiny=%D8%AA%D8%AF%D8%A7%D9%88%D9%84-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B3%D9%88%D9%82-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B3%D8%B9%D9%88%D8%AF%D9%8A-%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D8%A8%D8%A7%D8%B4%D8%B1&d7d=88 تداول السوق السعودي المباشر Author: DULCKEN, Henry William.
CIS 321 Week 7 iLab 7 Milestone 5 Part 3 Milestone 6 Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 9503.de.1."
اسعار الاسهم البيع والشراء في سلطنة عمان Page: 829
valutahandel afm Place of Publishing: London
كم اليوم السهم لبنك وربة Date of Publishing: 1888
http://kmr-spedition.at/?rater=www-iforex-ae&4e1=5a www iforex ae Publisher: Ward, Lock & Co.
العاب بيع اسهم Issuance: monographic
كم سعر الذهب اليوم للبيع Identifier: 001001163

تداولات ماليه عبر الأسهم مجانيه وأمنه Explore:
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http://aidtoschools.org/?c=%D8%B4%D8%B1%D9%83%D8%A7%D8%AA-%D9%81%D9%88%D8%B1%D9%8A%D9%83%D8%B3&e80=ff شركات فوريكس Image taken from page 148 of ‘A Strange Elopement. … Illustrations by W. H. Overend’
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forex bank thomas högväg Author: RUSSELL, William Clark.
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 012634.i.58."
Page: 148
Place of Publishing: London
Date of Publishing: 1892
Publisher: Macmillan and Co.
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 003194991

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Image from page 140 of “Prominent Jews of America; a collection of biographical sketches of Jews who have distinguished themselves in commercial, professional and religious endeavor” (1918)

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Image from page 140 of “Prominent Jews of America; a collection of biographical sketches of Jews who have distinguished themselves in commercial, professional and religious endeavor” (1918)
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Identifier: prominentjewsofa00tole
Title: Prominent Jews of America; a collection of biographical sketches of Jews who have distinguished themselves in commercial, professional and religious endeavor
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Jews
Publisher: Toledo, O., S. B. Goodkind, publication manager, American Hebrew publishing company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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orm of Jewish activity in and outside of the citywhere he resides. While he lived in Key West he played a prominent part inthe Committee which sought to create the independence of Cuba, sending menand ammunition out of the United States, and he lost one of his trade vesselson this occasion. He saw in this a part of Jewish vengeance against Spain, theold persecutor of the race. Louis Fine was born on the 27th of November, 1866. in Smorgon, Gov-ernment of Yilna. the son of Reb Abraham Pinucs and Ittee Fine. His fatheris a prominent Jewish scholar and his grandfather was the distinguished RabbiLeib Masirer. the rabbi of his native town. In iSS^ he was married to his>wife. Cadie who is the daughter of Reb Chaim Yankel Shwirsky. They arethe parents of two accomplished sons. Joseph M. and Isidore, and of a daugh-ter. Ida. who is married to Nathan Goldman, a highly intellectual and trulyJewish young man who is likewise in business in Miami and comes from amuch respected Rabbinical family.

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SAMUEL FINE The average young man of today knows very little of the severe hard-ships endured by those pioneers of commerce who came from Europe to seektheir fortunes in the new world. In fact, very few of them would have suffi-cient perseverance to pass through the fires of adversity which their elderswere obliged to endure. In the person of Mr. Samuel Fine we have an instance of a strong char-acter which was able to cope with the most difficult situations and attainwealth and independence. Mr. Fine was born in Kovno, Guberne, Russia, in 1878, and was marriedin the year 1894 to Miss Jennie Sodnisky. Five years later he decided thatAmerica would offer a better field for his endeavorsand leaving his family in Russia, came to East Bos-ton, where he was obliged to work at first for only.50 per week. After eight weeks he began buyingand selling junk, which he continued for threemonths. He then worked in an ice factory until hehad money enough to buy a horse and wagon. Buta short time af

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Image from page 286 of “Hints to homeseekers; a handbook of agricultural opportunities” (1914)
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Identifier: cu31924000327472
Title: Hints to homeseekers; a handbook of agricultural opportunities
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Geib, Warren Jacob, 1880-
Subjects: Agriculture Agriculture Farm life
Publisher: St. Paul, Webb pub. co.
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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n: West Raleigh; B. W. Kilgore.i State Station: Raleigh; B. W.Kilgore.iNorth Dakota—Agricultural Col-lege: J. H. Worst.1Ohio—Wooster: C. B. Thorne.iOklahoma—Stillwater: J. A. Wil- son.iOregon — Corvallis: J. Withy- combe.iPennsylvania—State College: R. L. Watts.sState College: Institute of Ani-mal Nutrition, H. P. Armsby.i Porto Rico—Federal Station: Mayaguez; D. W. May.^Sugar Planters Station: Rio Piedras; J. T. Crawley.1 Rhode Island—Kingston: . South Carolina — Clemson Col-lege: J. N. Harper.i South Dakota—Brookings: J. W.Wllson.i Tennessee—Knoxville: H. A. Mor-gan.i Texas—College Station: B. Young-blood.i Utah—Logan: E. D. Ball.i Vermont — Burlington: J. L.Hllls.i Virginia—Blacksburg: S. W.Fletoher.iNorfolk: Truck Station, T. C.Johnson.i Washington — Pullman: R. W. Thatcher.iWest Virginia—Morgantoion: E. D. Sanderson.iWisconsin—Madison: H. L. Rus- sell.iWyoming — Laramie: H. G. Knight.i ■ Director. 2 Special agent in charge, s Acting director.

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POULTRY MANUAL A Saf* Guido to Successful Poultry Cul* ture in all Branches. Fancy and Practical. By Franklane L. Sewell, worlds foremost pouUtuartist and authority on standard breeds, and Ida E<Tilson the well-known poultry expert and lecturer. Part 1. Fancy Poultry, the lea<^ng standard breeds: How they were one-inated; how to mate and breed them: their principal characteristics; hatching,rearineand exhibiting wiiminfr show birds, etc.—in fact all about fancy poultry.This part is illustrated with Mr. Sewells own drawings of fowls, sections andfeathers, made exclusively for this book. Fart 2. Practical Poultry Culture. Practical qualities of each of the leadingstandanl breeds; crosses and i^ades; the pr^tical laws of breeding; food and drinEfor fowls and chickens, feeding values of different grains, etc., a valuable chapter;secret aC winter laying; poultry parasite;,, microbes and vermin, how to extermin-ate them; diseases and their cures, includinsr diseases of the head, thr

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Image from page 96 of “Annual report of the Philadelphia Museum of Art” (1878)
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Identifier: annualreportof03phil
Title: Annual report of the Philadelphia Museum of Art
Year: 1878 (1870s)
Authors: Philadelphia Museum of Art Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. Annual report Pennsylvania Museum of Art. Annual report
Subjects: Philadelphia Museum of Art Art
Publisher: Philadelphia : Philadelphia Museum of Art
Contributing Library: Philadelphia Museum of Art, Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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ds Economist, New York, N. Y. COMMENCEMENT. The Commencement Exercises were held at Horticultural Hallon Tuesday evening, June 6th, and were followed by the AnnualExhibition of Students Work in the School Building, Broad andPine Streets. An address, The Riches of a Scholarly Spirit, was made byFrank A. Hill, Litt. D., of Boston, Mass., Secretary of the Massa-chusetts State Board of Education, with remarks by the Vice-President, William Piatt Pepper, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie_^ and Mr.Henry G. Lord, of the Textile World. DIPLOMAS. School of Applied Art. —Adelene Helen Black, Ella Permitta Kaufiman,Eileen Anna Knox, Oscar Earnest Mertz, Mary Sharpe Hemphill, Ida EvelynMacfarlane, Gertrude Harris Seeley. Textile School.—Armen Peter Aleon, Frederick Brown, .John Paul Jones,Ellsworth Moore, James Voorhees Poineroy, Frank Wilson Simons, Harris Aron-son Solomon, Edward Dewey Bloom, Clifford Mills Hoff, Edward Mills Maclean,Charles Emmons Pervear, Jr., Eobert Kead Shillingford, Fred Eoy Smith.

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ORIGINAL DESIGN FOR ECCLESIASTICAL DECORATION BY A PUPIL OF THE SCHOOL 41 SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART.Associate Committee of AVomens Prizes. First Prize, .00.—For the best set of drawings executed by students inthe Course of Lidiistrial Drawing. Awarded to Nellie G. Griffin. In consider-ation of the fact that the Committee was unable to decide between the two fore-most competitors, a Special Prize of .00 is awarded this year to Paul Hadley. Second Prize, .00.—For Original Design. Art School. Awarded toWalter G. Myers. First mention to Arthur G. Sprenkle. Second mention to Frank Albert Sima. Third Prize : For Original Design for Printed Fabrics. Awarded to JeanPritchard Prettyman. First mention to Bernard Eobert LeFort. Second mention to Roy EllingerBlithe. Third mention to Miriam Emilie Xash. Mrs. Joxes Wister Prize, .00.—For General Excellence. Awarded toEileen Anna Knox. Honorable mention to Oscar E. Mertz. Mrs. George K. Crozer Prize, .00.—Offered for the best work

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Image from page 163 of “Greatest wonders of the world” (1906)

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Identifier: greatestwonderso00sing
Title: Greatest wonders of the world
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors: Singleton, Esther, d. 1930
Subjects: Curiosities and wonders Landscapes
Publisher: New York, The Christian Herald
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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art of the finestmountain scenery in the Selkirks, which is so different tothe scenery of the Rockies. The Canadian Rockies areblunt-topped fisty mountains, with knuckles of bare rocksticking out everywhere. The Selkirks are graceful pyra-mids and sharp sierras, up to their shoulders in magnificentforests of lofty pines. The trees on the Rockies are muchsmaller and poorer. Right above the hotel, to the left ofthe overhanging Glacier, is the bare steeple of Sir Donald,one of the monarchs of the range ; Ross Peak and Cheopsfrown on the descent of the line to the Pacific; and theline of the Atlantic is guarded by the hundred pinnacles ofthe rifted mountain, formerly known as the Hermit, andnow, with singular infelicity, re-christened, in an eponymousfit, Mount Tupper. Sir Charles Tupper is one of Canadas greatest men, buthis name is more suitable for a great man than a greatmountain, especially since there is a very perfect effect ofa hermit and his dog formed by bouxders near the top of

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THE GREAT GLACIER OF THE SELKIRKS I 17 the mountain. The men in the railway camp have gotover this difficulty with the doggerel: Thats Sir Charles TupperGoing home to his supper. We made two long stays at the Glacier House, and Inever enjoyed anything more in my life than the effect ofthe snug little chalet, with its velvety lawn, in the strong-hold of the giant mountains, brought into touch with thegreat world twice a day by the trains east and west, whichechoed their approach and departure miles on miles throughthe ranges. On the Cars and Off (London, 1895). MAUNA LOA (.HA WA/nLADY BRASSEY AT 6:30 A. M., we made the island of Hawaii,rather too much to leeward, as we had been carriedby the strong current at least eighteen miles out of our course.We were therefore obliged to beat up to windward, in thecourse of which operation we passed a large bark running be-fore the wind—the first ship we had seen since leaving Tahiti—and also a fine whale, blowing close to us. We could notsee

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The Shoulders of Giants
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Image from page 817 of “Mémoires d’une contemporaine, : ou, Souvenirs d’une femme sur les principaux personnages de la république ,du consulat, de l’empire, etc. ..” (1828)

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Identifier: mmoiresdunecon56sain
Title: Mémoires d’une contemporaine, : ou, Souvenirs d’une femme sur les principaux personnages de la république ,du consulat, de l’empire, etc. ..
Year: 1828 (1820s)
Authors: Saint-Elme, Ida, 1778-1845 Malitourne, Armand, 1797-1866
Subjects:
Publisher: Paris : Ladvocat
Contributing Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library

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20141123Cheverus_gm_009
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BRAINTREE — Cardinal Seán P. O’Malley presented 116 Cheverus Award Medals to laypersons, deacons and religious during a 3 p.m. Vespers service yesterday on the Feast of Christ the King, at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Boston’s South End.

First presented in 2008 at the celebration to mark the conclusion of the archdiocese’s bicentennial year, the annual award recognizes Catholics for their dedicated service to the Church. The medal is named for the archdiocese’s first bishop, Jean-Louis Lefebvre de Cheverus, who led the diocese from 1808 until his return to France in 1824. Bishop Cheverus died in 1836 as the Archbishop of Bordeaux.

The oval-shaped medal is made of sterling silver and bears a likeness of Bishop Cheverus based on the Gilbert Stuart portrait. On the reverse side is Bishop Cheverus’ coat of arms.

The medal recipients are chosen for their service to the Church and God’s people. Most recipients are nominated by their pastor, forwarded by their area vicar and approved by their regional bishop and Cardinal O’Malley. Some recipients are personally selected by Cardinal O’Malley.

Each year, one-third of the parishes of the archdiocese are asked to nominate a parishioner. The criteria given to pastors is that the nominee should be a lay person who has served the parish well over an extended period of time and has done so in a quiet, unassuming and, perhaps, unrecognized fashion.

Also, each of the regional bishops is asked to nominate a religious and a deacon from his region with similar qualifications. The Central Ministries of the archdiocese also make nominations from among religious, deacons and lay persons who serve on archdiocesan committees or lead important ministries.

With this year’s group of recipients the total number of individuals and couples who have been named Cheverus medalists stands at 726. There were 93 recipients in 2013, 121 in 2012, 97 in 2011, 98 in 2010 and 133 in 2009. There were 68 awardees in 2008.

Friends and family members of the honorees are welcome to attend the service at the cathedral. The presence of the pastor and a delegation of parishioners is also encouraged to help underscore the parish’s appreciation for the service of the honoree.

Cheverus Award recipients 2014

Ms. Tete Adeleke, Sacred Hearts, Malden

Ms. Ana Gladys Amaya, Hispanic Community/Sacred Heart, Roslindale

Ms. Rosemary Angeramo, St. Adelaide, Peabody

Mrs. Dona Bacco, St. Rose of Lima, Topsfield

Mr. Alfred Belanger, St. Mary, Plymouth

Mr. Robert Berlo, St. Mary, Quincy

Mrs. Mary Blasi, St. Kateri Tekakwitha, Plymouth

Mrs. Jolyne Boyle St. Mary Star of the Sea, Beverly

Sister Patricia Boyle, CSJ, Pastoral Center Ministries

Mrs. Patricia Buckjune, Our Lady of Grace, Pepperell

Mr. Joseph Burke, St. Bernadette, Randolph

Mrs. Mary Caruso, St. Benedict Parish, Somerville

Mrs. Patricia Chevalier, St. John the Evangelist, N. Chelmsford

Mr. David (Dung) Chi Ngo, Vietnamese Community/Sacred Hearts, Malden

Sister Elizabeth Clarke, SHCJ, North Region

Brother David K. Coakley, OSB, South Region

Sister Mary Pedro Conway, SMSM, Archdiocese of Boston

Mrs. Florence Cranshaw, St. Theresa of Lisieux, Sherborn

Mr. Paul Francis Creegan Sr., St. Margaret of Scotland, Lowell

Ms. Helen Cross, Patronage of St. Joseph, Somerville

Ms. Kathleen E. Crozier, Our Lady of Victories, Boston

Sister Ellen Dabrieo, Brazilian Community/St. John the Baptist, Peabody

Mrs. Kelly Damon, St. Thecla, Pembroke

Mrs. Audanette David, Haitian Community/St. Matthew, Dorchester

Mr. James Davidson, Holy Ghost Parish, Whitman

Mr. Victor DeLeon, St. Mary of the Assumption, Lawrence

Mrs. Maria Della Porta, St. Leonard of Port Maurice, (Sacred Heart Church)

Ms. Claire Detora, Archdiocese of Boston

Mr. Nellio DiTullio, St. Joseph, Quincy

Ms. Doris DiTullio, St. Anthony of Padua, Everett

Mrs. Joan Donnelly, St. Marguerite D’Youville, Dracut

Mr. Timothy Donovan, St. Jerome, Weymouth

Mrs. Concetta Donovan, Our Lady Star of the Sea, Marblehead

Ms. Marie Aurore Dorcely, Haitian Community/St. Anne, Somerville

Mr. Daniel Falvey, Blessed Sacrament, Walpole

Ms. Janet A. Farrell, St. Cecilia, Ashland

Mr. and Mrs. Kevin and Lynne Feeney, St. Raphael, Medford

Ms. Donna Felzani, St. Anthony Padua, Revere

Ms. Joan Ferguson, St. Bridget, Maynard

Mr. Fernando Fernandez-Arellano, Our Lady of the Assumption, East Boston

Deacon Marcio O. Fonseca, Central Region/St. Mark, Dorchester

Mr. James Fowkes, St. Bridgid, South Boston

Dr. David Gabriel, St. Thomas the Apostle, Salem/Peabody (Posthumous)

Mr. Edio Galvez, Hispanic Community/St. Columbkille, Brighton

Mr. and Mrs. David and Kathleen Gannon, St. Richard of Chichester, Danvers

Ms. Phyllis Giordano, Society of St. James/St. Stephen, Boston

Mrs. Francis H. Girard, St. Theresa of Lisieux, Sherborn

Mr. Mel Gouthro, St. Mary, Wrentham

Ms. Ann Grady, St. Mary of the Angels, Roxbury

Brother Robert Green, CFX, North Region

Deacon James Greer, Pastoral Center Ministries

Ms. Doreen Gulledge, St. Peter, Cambridge

Mr. Richard Howard, St. Agnes, Reading

Ms. Jean Hunt, St. Ann, Dorchester (Neponset)

Brother John R. Jaskowiak, OFM , Central Region

Mr. Robert D. Keefe, St. Anthony Shrine, Boston

Ms. Ann J. Kleponis, St. Peter (Lithuanian Parish), South Boston

Mr. William L. Lajuenesse, St. Matthias, Marlborough

Mr. Richard LaPorte, Archdiocese of Boston

Ms. Margaret LaRoche, Our Lady Help of Christians, Newton

Ms. Pilar Latorre, Archdiocese of Boston

Mr. Robert J. Lavoie, St. John the Evangelist, Hopkington

Mr. William Lawless, St. John the Baptist, Quincy

Mr. Derryl Lawrence, St. Peter, Plymouth

Sister Mary Joan Lofgren, CSJ, South Region

Dr. Francis Lombardo, St. Eulalia, Winchester

Ms. Anne M. Lynch, Our Lady of Lourdes, Jamaica Plain

Mr. William MacDonald, St. Mary, Georgetown

Ms. Mary Magner, St. Thomas Aquinas, Nahant

Mrs. Ellie Martin, St. Dorothy, Wilmington

Ms. Mary Mc Ginn, St. John the Evangelist, Swampscott

Mr. John McClellan, St. James, Stoughton

Sister Maureen McDonough, OCarm/F, West Region

Mr. William "Skip" Miller, St. Vincent de Paul, South Boston

Sister Virginia Mulhern, SDNdeN, Central Region

Mr. Hung Nguyen, St. Mary, Randolph

Ms. Mary O’Rourke, St. Brendan, Dorchester

Mrs. Maribelle Ortiz, Hispanic Community/St. Patrick, Brockton

Mr. Remo Palomba, St. Thomas Aquinas, Jamaica Plain

Mrs. Anne Paradis, St. Augustine, Andover

Deacon John W. Pepi, St. Bridget, Maynard

Mrs. Jane B. Piacentini, St. George, Framingham

Mr. Wayne Pickles, Corpus Christi, Lawrence

Mr. Lee Pimentel, St. Francis of Assisi, Dracut

Mr. Joseph Puleo, St. Florence, Wakefield

Deacon Luis Rivera, North Region

Ms. Suzanne Robotham, St. Joseph, Belmont

Mr. Paul Roche, St. Bonaventure, Manomet

Ms. Susan Rudolph, St. John the Evangelist, Cambridge

Mrs. Carolyn N. Ryan, Sacred Heart, Weymouth

Deacon Kenneth N. Ryan, South Region

Mrs. Rose Shea, Cheverus Centennial School, Malden

Mr. Joseph Shubster, Holy Name, West Roxbury

Mrs. Katia Silva, Immaculate Conception, Stoughton

Ms. Angela Siraco, Our Lady of the Assumption

Mr. Don Soule, St. Martha, Plainville

Mrs. Patricia Souza, Brazilian Community/St. Anthony, Somerville

Ms. Patricia Strumm, Gate of Heaven, South Boston

Mr. John K. Sullivan, St. Gregory, Dorchester

Sister Margaret L. Sullivan, CSJ, Pastoral Center Ministries

Mr. Kam Sylvestre, Our Lady of Grace, Chelsea/Everett

Mr. Walter Symolon, St. Francis Xavier, Weymouth

Ms. Ida Toro, St. Patrick, Watertown

Mr. Paul Tousignant, St. Rita, Lowell

Ms. Mary Ellen Valeri, St. Pius V, Lynn

Ms. Mercedes Vazquez, St. Christopher, Dorchester

Mrs. Josephine Vendetti, Sacred Heart of Jesus, Cambridge

Dr. Miriam Vincent, St. Leonard of Port Maurice, Boston

Ms. Rachel Voiland, St. Lucy, Methuen

Mr. Lloyd Wajda, Archdiocese of Boston

Sister Agnes Wan, St. Joseph, Boston

Mr. Donald Wark, St. Anne, Salem

Mr. Arthur Whittemore, Department of Youth Services

Mr. John Wilhelm, St. Paul, Hamilton/Wenham

Mr. Benjamin A. Williams, St. Ann, West Bridgewater

Mr. Stephen Zrike Sr., St. Jude, Norfolk

Photos by George Martell – BCDS, Archdiocese of Boston 2014

Image from page 7 of “The life of Abraham Lincoln : drawn from original sources and containing many speeches, letters and telegrams hitherto unpublished, and illustrated with many reproductions from original paintings, photographs, et cetera” (1917)

Some cool ida b wells speech images:

Image from page 7 of “The life of Abraham Lincoln : drawn from original sources and containing many speeches, letters and telegrams hitherto unpublished, and illustrated with many reproductions from original paintings, photographs, et cetera” (1917)
ida b wells speech
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Identifier: lifeofabrahamli2458tarb
Title: The life of Abraham Lincoln : drawn from original sources and containing many speeches, letters and telegrams hitherto unpublished, and illustrated with many reproductions from original paintings, photographs, et cetera
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Tarbell, Ida M. (Ida Minerva), 1857-1944
Subjects: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 Presidents
Publisher: New York : Macmillan Co.
Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: State of Indiana through the Indiana State Library

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iece by BlendonCampbell and illustrations by Fay Hambidge Cloth, i2mo, %.6o Told so delicately, humanly, reverently, that one is better for the hearing.One laughs and cries at the sheer touch of nature. — New York Times. Madame Roland Portrait frontispiece, cloth, i2mo, Sr.jo An intimate biographical study, largely derived from hitherto unpublishedsources, of one of the most interesting women of the French Revolution. THE MACMILLAN COMPANY Publishers 64-66 Fifth Avenue New York ^I-loo%03i ^OZ^^d

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l.IIK MASK OF LINCOLN. 1860. AGE 5IMade in IsOO by Leonard V. Volk. of Chicago. Kroiii a phiitojiraph. The LIFE of ABRAHAMLINCOLN DRAWN/r<?;^ original SOURCESand containing many SPEECHES,LETTERS and TELEGRAMS hitherto unpublished^ and illustratedwith many reproductions from originalPaintings^ Photographs^ et ceteraNew Edition with New Matter BY IDA M. TARBELL Volume Two New YorkThe Macmillan Company MCMXVII All rights reserved Copyright, 1895, 1896, 1898, 1899By The S. S. McClure Co. Copyright, 1900By DouBLEDAY & McClure Co. Copyright, 1900By McClure, Phillips & Co. NEW EDITION WITH NEW MATTER Copyright, 191 7 By The Macmillan Company CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE XXII. The first inauguration of Lincoln—The relief of FortSumter—Sewards ambition to control the adminis-tration -<._—-i XXIII. The beginning of civil war —— 33 XXIV. The failure of Fremont—Lincolns first difficulties with McClellan—The death of Willie Lincoln – – – 6i XXV. Lincoln and emancipation ——lifeofabrahamli2458tarb

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Image from page 34 of “The life of Abraham Lincoln : drawn from original sources and containing many speeches, letters, and telegrams hitherto unpublished” (1900)
ida b wells speech
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Identifier: lifeofabraham2450tarb
Title: The life of Abraham Lincoln : drawn from original sources and containing many speeches, letters, and telegrams hitherto unpublished
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Tarbell, Ida M. (Ida Minerva), 1857-1944
Subjects: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 Presidents
Publisher: New York : Doubleday & McClure Co.
Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Digitizing Sponsor: The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant

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m adrift to become a wanderinglaboring-boy before he had learned even to read. Thomasseems not to have inherited any of the fathers estate, andfrom the first to have been obliged to shift for himself. Forseveral years he supported himself by rough farm work ofall kinds, learning, in the meantime, the trade of carpenterand cabinet-maker. According to one of his acquaintances, Tom had the best set of tools in what was then and nowWashington County, and was a good carpenter for thosedays, when a cabin was built mainly with the axe, and not anail or bolt-hinge in it; only leathers and pins to the door,and no glass. Although a skilled craftsman for his day,he never became a thrifty or ambitious man. He wouldwork energetically enough when a job was brought to him,but he would never seek a job. But if Thomas Lincolnplied his trade spasmodically, he shared the pioneers love forland, for when but twenty-five years old, and still withoutthe responsibility of a family, he bought a farm in Hardin

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;-*r; ^ : ■ ■■ ^ , >, * ^ ^ -A -; • , : – •m ■ ^ -vN Ifif-/- ^■■. > ^ ■J ; ■V-{ : ^^ ^v :, :rv.-^ v.^^ : ««»■ 1 : – vr < r , : vj ; -; V .■;.. . • ■: |- ■i~^ -.^ : T ■ ~ V: .:; J ■ – -yi ^ !^^ ^^ ^^ ■ iv.;-. ^;- h A. V v:i ■ )^r^ g; t. ^ i ORIGIN OF THE LINCOLN FAMILY 7 County, Kentucky. This fact is of importance, proving as itdoes that Thomas Lincoln was not the altogether shiftlessman he has been pictured. Certainly he must have beenabove the grade of the ordinary country boy, to have had theenergy and ambition to learn a trade and secure a farmthrough his own efforts by the time he was twenty-five. Hewas illiterate, never doing more in the way of writingthan to bunglingly write his own name. Nevertheless, hehad the reputation in the country of being good-natured andobliging, and possessing what his neighbors called goodstrong horse-sense. Although he was a very quiet sortof a man, he was known to be determined in his opinio

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The Price of Freedom
ida b wells speech
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The inscription on this statue outside the National Archives says: ‘Eternal vigilance Is the price of liberty’. This saying is often attributed to Thomas Jefferson, but apparently he never said exactly these words.

wiki.answers.com/Q/Who_said_eternal_vigilance_is_the_pric…

"This is often misattributed to Jefferson, but those words were never uttered in that way by anyone of note. The earliest statement that reflects this sentiment was made by John Philpot Curran in a speech upon the Right of Election in 1790 (published in a book titled "Speeches on the late very interesting State trials" in 1808). He said: "It is the common fate of the indolent to see their rights become a prey to the active. The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance; which condition if he break, servitude is at once the consequence of his crime and the punishment of his guilt." I hope this is helpful."

"In fact the words "Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty" were uttered by someone of great note, some one we too often forget in our histories of the United States. The final chapter of Ida B. Wells’ autobiography, Crusade for Justice (University of Chicago Press 1970), begins, "Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty." She goes on to argue that although the United States does have some "wonderful institutions" to protect our liberty, we have grown complacent and need to be "alert as the watchman on the wall." (415)."

"Ida B. Wells (1862-1931) crusades against the oppression of African American for all of her adult life. She’s is best known for her work against the growing lynchings of African American in the 1890s. See Southern Horrors and A Red Record, her pamphlets which detail her efforts to show that these lynchings were a means of terror to oppressed African Americans."

Jimmy Page: Magus, Musician, Man: An Unauthorized Biography

Jimmy Page: Magus, Musician, Man: An Unauthorized Biography

Jimmy Page: Magus, Musician, Man: An Unauthorized Biography

  • Softcover310 pagesSize: 9″ x 6″Author: George CaseISBN: 879309474

(Book). Now in paperback, Jimmy Page: Magus, Musician, Man is the first-ever biography of Led Zeppelin’s legendary guitarist and producer. Never before has the story been told in such sharp detail, leaving no stone unturned, from the heady days of swinging London in the 1960s when Page was lighting up the scene as an incendiary session man through the bombast, beauty, and blues that is Led Zeppelin (not to mention the wanton sex and drug orgies that would come to define rock excess). Here

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Image from page 74 of “Lebanon Valley College Catalog” (1917)

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Image from page 74 of “Lebanon Valley College Catalog” (1917)
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Identifier: lebanonvalley191718leba
Title: Lebanon Valley College Catalog
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Lebanon Valley College
Subjects: Lebanon Valley College Universities and colleges college catalogs Lebanon Valley College-curricula-catalogs Universities and Colleges-curricula-catalogs
Publisher: Lebanon Valley College
Contributing Library: Lebanon Valley College, Vernon and Doris Bishop Library
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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ntal to pro-fessional and engineering courses. FACTS TO BE CONSIDERED Although Academy students enjoy a number of the same featuresas college students, such as the use of an extended library, laboratories, 62 BULLETIN the same social privileges, literary exercises, debates, Christian Associ-ations, etc., they are in many respects an entirely separate student body. SCHOLARSHIP A one hundred and forty dollar scholarship is awarded each year tothe Academy graduate who has, according to the vote of the Faculty,attained the best class record and deported himself in accordance withthe regulations. . Conservatory of Musicand Art FACULTY E. EDWIN SHELDON, Mus. M.Pianoforte, Pipe Organ, Counterpoint, Composition IDA MANEVAL-SHELDON, MUS. B.Pianoforte, Harmony, Musical History GERTRUDE KATHERINE SCHMIDT Voice, Public School Music, Sight Singing PERCY MATHIAS LINEBAUGH, Mus. B.Pianoforte, Theory, Ear Training, Sight Playing ZELINE Von BEREGHYViolin, Cello MIRIAM RHEA OYER Tutor Musical Dictation

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fLEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 65 LOCATION AND EQUIPMENT The Engle Conservatory of Music is a handsome, three-story, stonestructure. It contains a fine auditorium with large pipe-organ, directorsroom, studios, practice rooms, waiting, and writing room for studentsuse, large society rooms, lavatories, etc. The whole building is lighted byelectricity, and heated by steam, and designed and furnished with aview to having it complete in every respect for the study of music in allits branches. A complete musical education, from the very first stepsto the highest artistic excellence, may be secured. The director will useevery effort to obtain positions for those students who have finished thecourses, and who may wish to teach or perform in public. OBJECT The department has for its object the foundation and diffusion of ahigh and thorough musical education. The methods used are those fol-lowed by the leading European conservatories. The courses are broad,systematic, progressive, and as rapid as poss

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Image from page 171 of “Gleanings in bee culture” (1874)
ida b. wells facts
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Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu50medi
Title: Gleanings in bee culture
Year: 1874 (1870s)
Authors:
Subjects: Bees Bee culture
Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

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for everypurpose. Mr. West has a large horizontalboiler, one firing of which gives him all the steam he can use for several hours. He wasfortunate in securing this old creamery. J. M. Stark of Middleton, Idaho, has acommodious well-built honey-house right intown. A good-sized boiler at the rearkeeps him supplied with steam. He candrive right into a shed adjoining the build-ing. Long windows in the side and frontof his house furnish an abundance of light. R. A. Bray of Big Timber, Mont., sometime ago had a disastrous fire, in which helost his building and everything in it, sav-ing absolutely nothing except a honey pump,which, being full of honey at the time, wasnot injured by the heat. His new buildingis constructed of solid concrete, and is amodel structure in every way. It has con-crete floors thruout and abundance oflight, water, steam and all modern con-veniences. One room is partitioned off foran office, another for the boiler, extractingequipment and tanks, while the rest of the

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J. M. Starks honey-house, Middleton, Ida. The vertical steam boiler in the shed outside furnishes ample steam for all purposes. March, 1923 GLEANINGS IN BEE CULTURE 149 building is left for tlio storage of supplies,for his garage, etc. One thing that impressed itself on mymind most forcibly when visiting thesewestern beekeepers is the fact that roomand light, plenty of both, are considered in-dispensable, and I am sure that they payfor themselves in the saving of labor. Noone can do efficient work in dark, small,poorly ventilated rooms. The outdoors ofthe West seems larger and loftier than thatof the East. Perhaps that is the reason whybuildings used by the western beekeepersaverage larger than those used by easternbeekeepers. In this brief article I have not attemptedto give floor plans. I have seen extractingrooms by the score, but I have never seentwo arranged just alike. This is not sur- prising. There are possibly 700 kitchens inMedina, and while some of tliem are thesame in size

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Image from page 55 of “The chief” (1917)
ida b. wells facts
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Identifier: chief00gree_1
Title: The chief
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Greenville High School (Greenville, Ohio)
Subjects: Greenville High School (Greenville, Ohio)
Publisher: [Greenville, Ohio] : Published by the senior class of the Greenville High School
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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uiveringframe, and listened patiently to the chattering teeth. At length, bursting into arumbling laugh, he staggered about and hurried to the house. From behind thedoor he grasped a rusty old blunderbuss. He next began to search for his powderhorn and some salt and pepper or some otherextract of the pantry, which might awakesome enthusiasm in the luckless indiivdualwho had trespassed on Bills premises. Fin-ally he found some beans, so beans it wasthat Bill poured down the barrel of his forty-two centimeter. When Bill reached the door, he saw hisyoung friend, or enemy, beating a retreatthru the nearest thicket. Nevertheless, Billraised his gun and fired just as the fast dis-appearing Mr. Sherifif stumbled headlongover a root. The sheriff is now getting along nicelyin the hospital at the village, all the beanshaving been extracted without much disfigur-ation to his carcass. As to Bill, he is still athrifty man of leisure down in Cleaver Hollerold old Kentucky. Herman Krickenberger, 17.

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50 THE AWAKENING OF IDA. Ida Elaine Jallis opened her geometry book and, while futilely wonderingat which point to first attack Proposition No. 328, she fell to dreaming over theprinted initials of the original owner, Stanley Kent. Secretly she was very muchin love with the unknown person, and she had all year dreamed and sighed overthe many small bits of wisdom and learning that had been written by the adoredStanleys pen upon the well-thumbed margins of the pages. Pensively she claspedher hands together under her chin and then slid them along one cheek til her headrested coquettishly on one side. In this attitude she worshipped her hero untilnidely aroused by a poke in the back. This, from Sarah Saxon, her best chumand the sister of the boy who knew and had once been a chum with the StanleyX. Kent, the S. N. K. This, and the fact that she was one year Idas senior, made her the adoredone of the time being. Ida squirmed to a half sideways posture and turned at-tentive and inquiring ear

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Image from page 494 of “The Utah Farmer : Devoted to Agriculture in the Rocky Mountain Region” (1913)

A few nice childhood (quotation subject) images I found:

Image from page 494 of “The Utah Farmer : Devoted to Agriculture in the Rocky Mountain Region” (1913)
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Identifier: utahfarmerdevot1219utah_0
Title: The Utah Farmer : Devoted to Agriculture in the Rocky Mountain Region
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors: Utah State Agricultural College. Extension Service
Subjects: Agriculture Farmers Farm management Farm produce Farmers’ spouses
Publisher: Lehi and Salt Lake City, Ut. Co
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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ROYALLY MADE FOR ACRITICAL TRADE WHEN IN SALT LAKE MEET YOUR FRIENDSAT Ufarts TLuncI) The Sign of a Good Place to EatSALT LAKE CITY MERRILL KEYSERCO. Buyers andWholesale ShippersGRAIN PRODUCE. BAGS SALT LAKE CITY Ask for quotations. What Are YourPrinting Needs Every farmer should paymore attention to his needs Inprinting. Those not acquaintedwith him judge him by theprinted matter he sends our Neatly printed Letterheads,Envelopes, Butter Wrappers,Advertising Circulars, etc..add greatly to his influence andprestige. What Are Your Needs? We are equipped and pre-pared to furnish you with any-thing in that line at the lowestpossible cost. Send us your next job, or« get our estimates. LEHI SUNPUBLISHING CO.Lehi Utah MAIL USYOUR FILMS WE PAY POSTAGE We Develop Any Size ffolf 10$We Develop Any Size Film Pack 2OfWe Make An 8*10 Enlargement 25*IdrgerSizesAtEgualluAttractivePrices Schramm-Jnhnsnn SALT LAKE CITY

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10 (490) THE UTAH FARMER SATURDAY, MARCH 4, 191C THE HOME THE NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ITS CARE, Notes from Talk Given by Dr. M. J.McFarland at Logan Round-Up. Conservation of nervous systemmust begin in Childhood. Sleep. From birth to six monthsthe baby should sleep undisturbed,except at regular feeding times, mostof the 24 hours. From eighteenmonths to two years, twelve hoursat night and four in the day. Dividethe day time period into two parts.From two till five years, a nap in theafternoon immediately after dinnerso as not to interfere with the earlybedtime which should be not laterthan seven oclock. Playing withyoung children just before putting tobed is a sure way to prevent themfrom going to sleep. The child shouldbe happy and kept interestedly busy,and natural fatigue will induce sleep.Plenty of fresh air, sufficient but nottoo much covering and absolute quietare necessities. Taking babies andyoung children out to theaters anddances is injurious. The close, hotrooms, lights, noise a

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Image from page 421 of “The town and city of Waterbury, Connecticut” (1896)
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Identifier: towncityofwaterb03ande
Title: The town and city of Waterbury, Connecticut
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Anderson, Joseph, 1836-1916, ed Prichard, Sarah J. (Sarah Johnson), 1830-1909 Ward, Anna Lydia, b. 1850?
Subjects: Waterbury (Conn.) — History Waterbury (Conn.) — Genealogy
Publisher: New Haven, The Price and Lee company
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ence to theimpression produced by the changes of later years: As I behold thee, cropt, deserted, bare, Thy forests felled to glut the furnace maw. My kindred mouldering neath those unkempt mounds. Their fields by strangers claimed, uncouth and raw. While desolation drapes thy untilled grounds,— Yet breathest thou still of youth, and all I see Brings back afresh my childhoods prime to me. Mr. Alcott survived an attack of apoplexy which occurred in theautumn of 1882, and lived until March 4, 1888. The companion son-net to that on Wolcott Hill, written the following week, is entitled* Immortality. Not alone for the Shakesperean quality of theopening quatrain, but for its noble sentiment throughout, it isworthy of quotation here: Welcome the tribute sometimes Fortune steals From youths exchequer to enrich old age ! What ample pension freely forth she deals To gild with glory his gray equipage; Whilst oer Times track slow roll his chariot wheels. Then Heavens gate enter. He, his heritage

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^/y^tnA.-<^^^<^ ^:^^^c:^<^-t^^ (In his eighty-second year, travelling in Iowa, 1SS2.) POETS AND PROSE WRITEMS. 933 Of life receiving, breaks the sacied seals,—High privilege sole given to saint and sage !Life were but ashes, and one holocaust,If no fair future welcomed from its goal,No gate swung open to admit us,—lostWere all companionship, and blank the soul,—Ah, dead to all life holds and knows its own,If Youth survive not and uphold its throne. It is well remembered that Mr. Alcotts daughter, Louisa, whosecrown of authorship is so much brighter than his, survived himbut a single day. They are buried in Sleepy Hollow cemetery inConcord, between the graves of Emerson and Thoreau and near thegrave of Hawthorne. The poetry thus far referred to, as distinguished from the pro-ducers of it, had its origin outside of Waterbury. An exhaustivetreatment of the subject would involve at least a reference to oneor two men in the earlier time who remained in their native town,and

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